Greenland: Doing business & staying in touch

Doing business in Greenland

Suits should be worn. A knowledge of Danish is extremely useful.

Office hours

Mon-Fri 0900-1700 or 0800-1600.

Economy

Greenland withdrew from the European Community (now the European Union) in February 1985 over the issue of the fisheries policy. EU member states are allowed to fish within Greenland's maritime exclusion zone in exchange for an annual cash payment; this compensates, in part, for the loss of development aid which Greenland would otherwise have received. It also enjoys preferential access to EU markets.

Although there are plans to develop the island's mineral deposits of iron ore, uranium, zinc, lead and coal, the economy ultimately depends on large subsidies from the Danish central government. The KNI (Royal Greenland Trade Department) organises transport, supplies and production in the country.

In November 2008, Greenland voted to become a separate country within the Kingdom of Denmark (Self-Rule Act). A new era of self-rule came into effect in June 2009. The self-rule agreement gives Greenlanders the right to self-determination and more control over its natural reserves, as well as making Greenlandic the official language.

GDP

US$1.7 billion (2005).

Main exports

Fish and fish products.

Main imports

Machinery and transport equipment, manufactured goods, food and petroleum products.

Main trading partners

China, Denmark, Japan, Norway and Sweden.

Keeping in Touch in Greenland

Telephone

There are no area codes. There are no telephone boxes in Greenland, but calls can be made from hotels.

Mobile phone

Handsets can be hired at TELE Greenland shops (in all cities). A deposit is required. Roaming agreements exist with some international mobile phone companies. Coverage is limited to main towns.

Internet

There are Internet cafes in many towns. Access is available in some public libraries.

Post

Greenland produces its own stamps which are popular among collectors. Post from Greenland takes about four to five days to reach Europe.

Post office hours

Mon-Fri 0900-1500.

Press

• There are no daily newspapers in Greenland, but Atuagagdliutit/Gronlandsposten is published twice a week, while Sermitsiaq is the main weekly publication.
• There are no English language newspapers.

Television

Kalaallit Nunaata Radio (Radio Greenland) (www.knr.gl) broadcasts television programmes in Greenlandic and Danish.

Radio

Kalaallit Nunaata Radio (Radio Greenland) (www.knr.gl) also broadcasts radio programmes in Greenlandic and Danish.

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