Foreign travel advice

Cape Verde

Summary

UK health authorities have classified Cape Verde as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. There have also been sporadic cases of malaria reported in the capital city, Praia (Santiago Island). For more information and advice, visit the website of the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Most visits to Cape Verde are trouble-free, but you should take sensible precautions against petty crime. See Crime

Many British nationals have experienced serious problems when buying property in Cape Verde. Before buying property anywhere on the islands, you should seek independent qualified legal advice.

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Cape Verde, attacks can’t be ruled out.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

Safety and security

Crime

Crime affects all islands of Cape Verde, but the number of incidents affecting British nationals is generally low. Burglaries and muggings have been reported on the main tourist islands of Sal and Boavista. Be vigilant and keep sight of your belongings at all times. Leave valuables in a hotel safe if possible and don’t carry large amounts of cash. Avoid unlit areas after dark. Some petty crimes like pick-pocketing or handbag snatching are carried out by children. Take extra care if you see groups of children who appear not to have any adult supervision.

Make sure your holiday accommodation is secure. Lock all doors and windows at night and when you go out. If you’re worried about security at your accommodation, speak to your tour operator, hotel manager or to the owner of the property.

Sexual assaults are rare but they do occur. Be alert and avoid secluded stretches of the beach, including Praia do Estoril, Praia de Chaves and Praia de Santa Monica on the island of Boavista. If you become a victim of crime, contact the local police. In an emergency call 132 (police) or 131 (fire). Response times vary and service standards may not be as high as in the UK.

Road travel

Traffic is usually light and road conditions and driving standards are generally of a reasonable quality.

The rainy season in Cape Verde is from mid August to mid October. Torrential rains can cause floods and landslides. Monitor local weather reports and expect difficulties when travelling to affected areas during this season.

Local Travel

Intercity bus services can be dangerous due to poor driving. Taxis hailed from hotels are generally reliable. In Praia, city buses and taxis are reliable, clean and in good condition. Car rental is widely available on the islands of Santiago, Sal, Boa Vista and São Vicente.

Sea travel  

Sea conditions around Cape Verde are sometimes dangerous. Take local advice before travelling by sea. Travel by sea to the southern islands of Fogo and Brava in particular can often be disrupted.

Take care if you participate in water sports, swimming, boating and fishing. Tides and currents around the islands are very strong.

Political situation

The political situation is generally stable, but you should avoid demonstrations and large gatherings

Terrorism

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Cape Verde, attacks can’t be ruled out.

There’s a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Find out more about the global threat from terrorism, how to minimise your risk and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack.

Entry Requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

You’ll need a visa to enter Cape Verde. Specialist travel agents dealing with Cape Verde can often arrange visas.

It’s also possible to get a visa on arrival, although some travellers have reported difficulties and delays.

You can get a visa before you travel from

  • the Cape Verde Embassy in Brussels,
    Ambassade du Cap-Vert,
    Avenue Jeanne 29,
    1050, Bruxelles
    Telephone: +32 2 64 36 270
    Fax:+32 2 64 63 385 emb.caboverde@skynet.be

  • the Cape Verde Consulate General in Holland
    Baan 6
    Rotterdam
    3011 CB
    Telephone: +31 10 477 8977
    Fax: +31 10 477 4553 cons.cverde-nl@wxs.nl

  • the Embassy of Cape Verde,
    3, Avenue El-Hadjily MBAYE,
    B.P. 11.269,
    Dakar,
    Senegal
    Telephone:+221-3382-11873/13936 email: acvc.sen@metissacana.sn

Passport validity

Your passport should be valid for the full duration of your stay in Cape Verde.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Cape Verde.

Yellow fever certificate requirements

Check whether you need a yellow fever certificate by visiting the National Travel Health Network and Centre’s TravelHealthPro website.

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

UK health authorities have classified Cape Verde as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. Sporadic cases of malaria have also been reported, including in the capital city, Praia (Santiago Island). For more information and advice, visit the website of the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Medical facilities in Cape Verde are limited, and some medicines are in short supply or unavailable. The largest hospitals are in Praia and Mindelo, with smaller medical facilities and clinics located throughout the country. Medical facilities are particularly limited on the island of Boavista. The islands of Brava and Santo Antão no longer have functioning airports, so air evacuation in the event of a medical emergency is extremely difficult from these two islands.

Some of the islands are mountainous, and travellers venturing into areas of altitude may suffer from altitude sickness, which can potentially be life threatening.

Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 130 (Santiago Island) and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Natural disasters

Hurricanes

The rainy season in Cape Verde runs from August to October.

Hurricanes can develop, although hurricanes often begin their formation in the waters around the Cape Verde Islands, they rarely reach hurricane strength close to the Islands. A typical Cape Verde-type hurricane develops in the area south of the islands, usually during the rainy season from August to October. You should monitor local and international weather updates from the US National Hurricane Center..

Sand storms

Some of the islands may experience sand storms (known locally as “bruma seca”) between December and February. The intensity of the storms varies but can disrupt air travel especially on the island of Boa Vista. If a sand storm occurs while you’re on one of the islands contact your tour operator or airline.

Local laws and customs

Local laws and customs

Penalties for possessing, using or trafficking illegal drugs are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.

Money

The Cape Verde Escudo is tied to the Euro at CV Esc 110.265 = 1 Euro. Banks will exchange hard currencies. Main hotels and restaurants will accept Visa cards. Credit cards are rarely used. A few major hotels accept Visa

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send us a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.