Foreign travel advice

Bermuda

Summary

As Bermuda is a British Overseas Territory, there’s no formal British diplomatic or consular representation. The local authorities deal with all requests for emergency assistance.

The hurricane season in Bermuda normally runs from June to November. You should monitor progress of storms on the Bermuda weather service and National Hurricane Centre websites and follow the advice of the local authorities.

Most visits to Bermuda are trouble-free, but you should take sensible precautions to protect yourself and your belongings.

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Bermuda, attacks can’t be ruled out.

Safety and security

Crime

Bermuda has a moderate crime rate driven in part by the drugs scene. Serious incidents, including use of weapons, do occur. Take precautions to safeguard yourself and your possessions. Common crimes include burglary, mugging, theft of unattended baggage and belongings, and theft of items from rental scooters.

The Bermuda Police Service website provides Tourist Safety Tips. Take particular care after dark.

Stick to well-lit parts of the island and avoid quieter, darker streets. There have been incidents of sexual assault. If you need help, contact the Bermuda Police Service in the first instance. 

Road Travel

Tourists are not allowed to drive cars in Bermuda.

Buses, ferries and taxis are generally safe, frequent and efficient. You can’t hire a car in Bermuda, but 50cc scooters are readily available for public hire. A small number of 2-person minicars are offered as an alternative to motorcycles in some locations. Driving is on the left, as in the UK. Roads are narrow, winding and undulating, and traffic may be heavy. Road accidents involving scooters are relatively common, and have resulted in serious injury or even death. You should take care. The national speed limit is 35kmh (22mph) but is lower in some urban areas.

Outside the major urban areas there are few footpaths or street lighting. Take care when out walking, especially at night.

Terrorism

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Bermuda, attacks can’t be ruled out.

There’s a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Find out more about the global threat from terrorism, how to minimise your risk and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack.

Local laws and customs

Bermuda is a separate legal jurisdiction to the United Kingdom and has its own laws.

Don’t become involved with drugs of any kind. Possession or importation can attract severe penalties.

The possession or importation of weapons (including air pistols and catapults) or ammunition (including empty magazines) is illegal. Those caught will be subject to severe penalties.

Bermuda, while welcoming, is a conservative place and you should dress modestly. Bathing suits, revealing tops and short shorts should only be worn at the beach or pools. There are no nude or topless beaches and it is an offence to appear in public topless or wearing a bathing suit top. Drinking alcohol in public outside of licensed premises is not allowed.

Homosexuality became legal under Bermuda law in 1994, and in 2017 the Supreme Court of Bermuda ruled that same-sex couples have a legal right to marry. Attitudes to homosexuality are tolerant but conservative and some people may not approve of public displays of affection between same-sex couples.

Entry requirements

Visas

British passport holders don’t need a visa to enter Bermuda as a visitor, but you must book accommodation before you arrive. Visitors are usually granted entry for up to 90 days. For further enquiries about visas, visit the website of the nearest British Embassy or High Commission, or the Government of Bermuda website.

If you wish to extend your stay while in Bermuda, you must get permission from the Bermuda Department of Immigration before your initial 21 day stay ends. While an extension of stay is not automatic, extensions are normally granted.  

Passport Validity

You must hold a valid passport to enter Bermuda. Your passport should be valid for the proposed duration of your stay. No additional period of validity beyond this is required.

Work permits

If you wish to work in Bermuda, you must secure a job before coming to the island. Your employer will then apply to the Department of Immigration for a work permit, and once this is received you may enter the country to work. You may not seek employment while visiting Bermuda.

Department of Immigration, Government Administration Building, Parliament Street, Hamilton. (Telephone: +1 441 295 5151) www.gov.bm

Medication

Make sure you carry any medication in the prescribed packaging and bring the prescription. For further information see the website of HM Customs of Bermuda.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Bermuda.

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

Bermuda has good modern medical facilities with a fully equipped general hospital and numerous doctors and dentists. King Edward Memorial Hospital has a good accident and emergency department.

Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation by air ambulance as cases that can’t be dealt with in Bermuda are usually referred to either Baltimore or Boston in the USA. Make sure your insurance covers any additional medical expenses incurred in the USA

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 911 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Natural disasters

The hurricane season in Bermuda normally runs from June to November. You should monitor the progress of storms on the Bermuda Weather Service and National Hurricane Centre websites, and follow the advice of the local authorities.

See our tropical cyclones page for information and advice about what to do if you’re caught up in a storm.

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send us a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.