Things to see in Lisbon

Tourist offices

Lisbon Tourism Visitors & Convention Bureau

Rua do Arsenal 23, Lisbon, 1100-038, Portugal
Tel: +351 21 031 2700.
Opening Hours: Daily 0900-2000.
www.visitlisboa.com

Passes

The Lisboa Card (www.lisboacard.org) offers unlimited travel and free or discounted entry to more than 50 museums and attractions, plus a Lisbon guide. Passes are available for 24-, 48- or 72-hours and can be bought from all tourist offices.

Castelo de São Jorge (Castle of St George)

Perched on the highest of Lisbon's seven hills, Castelo de São Jorge was the royal residence until the 15th century. Built by the Visigoths, the castle was severely damaged by an earthquake in 1755 and wasn’t restored until 1940. Its best attractions are the panoramic views from the ramparts and the beautiful gardens.

Opening Times: Daily 0900-2100 (Mar-Oct); daily 0900-1800 (Nov-Feb).
Admission Fees: Yes
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: No
Address: Largo do Chäo da Feira, Lisbon, Portugal
Telephone: +351 218 800 620.
Rua Augusta Arch

Take a lift to the top of the Rua Augusta Arch for breathtaking views over Praça do Comércio square, Sé Cathedral and São Jorge Castle. The arch was built to celebrate the city’s reconstruction after the 1755 earthquake and marks the start of the central Baixa area, which bustles with shops, cafés and market stalls.

Opening Times: Daily 1000-2100.
Admission Fees: Yes
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: No
Address: Rua Augusta, Lisbon, Portugal
Torre de Belém (Belém Tower)

Completed in 1515, the Belém Tower is one of Lisbon's most famous sights. Built to defend the River Tagus, it would have been the last thing intrepid seafarers saw as they sailed out of the port to expand the Portuguese Empire. Inside is a rather average museum, so take to the terrace instead for views across the city.

Opening Times: Tue-Sun 1000-1730 (Oct-Apr), Tue-Sun 1000-1830 (May-Sep).
Admission Fees: Yes
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: Yes
Address: Avenida de Brasília, Belém, Lisbon, Portugal
Telephone: +351 213 620 034.
Miradouros (viewing points)

With seven hills, Lisbon has a number of perfect viewpoints. The Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcântara at the top of the Elevador de Glória funicular, offers views over Baixa and across to Castelo de São Jorge. Hop off Tram 28 to see the view over Alfama and the River Tagus from the Miradouro Santa Luzia and Miradouro das Portas do Sol. Further along the tram route is the Miradouro da Graça which overlooks the Mouraria and the Castelo.

Opening Times: Daily 24 hours.
Admission Fees: No
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: No
Address: Lisbon, Portugal
Mosteiro dos Jerónimos (Hieronymites Monastery)

This 16th-century monastery is one of the few surviving examples of medieval Manueline architecture, characterised by its maritime motifs. The high arches, impressive columns and ornate spires are entwined with Portugal’s trading fortunes. It’s the resting place of Vasco da Gama, who set sail from Bélem in 1497 to discover India, and Luís de Camões, Portugal's famed poet.

Opening Times: Tue-Sun 1000-1730 (Oct-May), Tue-Sun 1000-1830 (May-Sep).
Admission Fees: Yes
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: Yes
Address: Praça do Império, Lisbon, Portugal
Telephone: +351 21 362 0034.
Museu Calouste Gulbenkian (Calouste Gulbenkian Museum)

Calouste Gulbenkian amassed this treasure trove of art, which covers almost every significant epoch from the medieval ages to the early 20th century. Half the exhibition is taken over by Egyptian, Greco-Roman, Islamic and Oriental art, while the remainder is devoted to European works. The complex also hosts monthly classical and jazz concerts.

Opening Times: Wed-Mon 1000-1800.
Admission Fees: Yes
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: No
Address: Avenida de Berna 45A, Lisbon, Portugal
Telephone: +351 217 823 000.
Museu Nacional do Azulejo (National Tile Museum)

Located in the Convent of Madre de Deus, a magnificently ornate chapel built in 1509, this museum catalogues the history of Portugal’s azulejos (glazed tiles). The ceramic tiles cover much of the city and this gallery has a collection that spans the art form from 15th century to the present day.

Opening Times: Tue-Sun 1000-1800.
Admission Fees: Yes
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: No
Address: Rua de Madre de Deus 4, Lisbon, Portugal
Telephone: +351 218 100 340.
Parque das Nações (Nations Park)

This former Expo ‘98 site is now an oasis of shopping centres, architectural attractions, concert halls, bars, restaurants and a walkway along the River Tagus. It’s also home to Torre Vasco da Gama, the site's landmark tower, which has an observation platform and a restaurant. Do note, though that the park can get uncomfortably busy in the summer.

Opening Times: Daily 0900-2000.
Admission Fees: No
Disabled Access: Yes
Unesco: No
Address: Parque das Nações, Lisbon, Portugal
Telephone: +351 218 949 066.
Tram 28

Vintage trams ply a well-worn route from the city centre up through the jumble of streets to the heights of the Castelo de São Jorge. Ride Tram 28, which slices open the city, providing insights into Lisbon life, as well as offering sweeping views across the River Tagus. Be prepared to queue and watch out for pickpockets.

Opening Times: Daily 0600-0100.
Admission Fees: Yes
Disabled Access: No
Unesco: No
Address: Lisbon, Portugal
Telephone: +351 217 980 600.
Website: www.carris.pt
Águas Livres Aqueduct

Build to supply water to Lisbon, the impressive 18 km-long (11 mile) Águas Livres Aqueduct is a national monument with 109 startling baroque stone arches. Erected by architects Manuel da Maia and Custodio José Vieira in 1748, the arches helped the aqueduct survive the 1755 earthquake, which laid waste to most of the city.

Opening Times: Daily 24 hours.
Admission Fees: No
Disabled Access: No
Unesco: No
Address: Largo do Rato, Lisbon, Portugal
Newsletter
test