Norway Health Care and Vaccinations

Title Special precautions
Diphtheria

No

Hepatitis A

No

Malaria

No

Rabies

No

Tetanus

Yes

Typhoid

No

Yellow Fever

No

The World Health Organisation [WHO] recommends that all travellers should be inoculated for measles, mumps, diphtheria, rubella, tetanus and polio regardless of the destination.

Health risks in Norway are few, with most visitors likely to suffer nothing more serious than a few blisters from hiking or insect bites in the summer. Standards of health care are high but as with everything else in Norway, healthcare is expensive, so insurance is a must. Chemist shops are called apotek and can be found on every high street. In an emergency, you can get treatment from the nearest public hospital free of charge. Dial 113 toll-free for an ambulance. Most operators also speak English.

Food and drink

Food in Norway is safe to eat although care should be taken when purchasing food from unlicensed/roadside stalls. Norwegian tap water is safe to drink, although drinking from fjords, streams and rivers – however clean they look – isn’t recommended as even the most inviting-looking water can harbour parasites. Water that has been boiled or treated with iodine or chlorine tablets is usually safe to drink.

Other risks

Vaccination for tick-borne encephalitis is sometimes recommended.

Edited by Jane Duru
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