Places in Dominica

Top events in Dominica

May
12

This is a great one for the Hike buffs. This year, Hike Fest will focus on the newly launched Waitukubuli National Trail, the first and only long...

July
06

All diving enthusiasts should head to Dominca for this one. Other than the obvious dive opportunities there are several seminars and workshops on...

October
26

One of Dominica's most popular events the World Creole Music Festival brings Creole Music and Culture to the world! Local acts that showcase the...

Trafalgar Falls, Dominica
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Trafalgar Falls, Dominica

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Dominica Travel Guide

Key Facts
Area

751 sq km (290 sq miles).

Population

73,016 (UN estimate 2016).

Population density

98 per sq km.

Capital

Roseau.

Government

Republic.

Head of state

President Charles Savarin since 2013.

Head of government

Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit since 2004.

Electricity

220/240 volts AC, 50Hz. British-style plugs with three square pins are used. Many hotels have dual 220/110 voltage.

The Caribbean island of Dominica is a natural treasure. Visitors will find a medley of brooding volcanic peaks, gushing mountain streams, dense forests, quiet lakes and spouting geysers. As you might have already guessed, it's a diverse and beautiful land.

Given its natural assets and warm and welcoming locals, Dominica should be a bustling tourism hotspot. Despite being one of the poorest in the region, crime is relatively low. But a marked lack of pumping nightlife, no direct flights to Dominica from the UK and little in the way of sandy beaches all mean it remains off the radar for many travellers. And yet this is what makes the island so appealing for the intrepid few.

Those partial to hiking amid thick tropical rainforest and gazing at bubbling lakes, will find this sunny green isle has many charms. In fact, much of Dominica is the domain of sprawling jungle, making it ideal for trekking. Adventuring your way around Dominica's natural delights is very much a primordial experience. On your travels through red mud trails and over undulating volcanic slopes, you'll find thundering waterfalls, hot springs where you can let nature heal your aches and pains, and even swim through a narrow gorge. Explore colourful coral reef with your snorkelling gear, be buoyed by bubbling volcanic water and visit the rawest spas imaginable – Dominica has so much to offer.

Perhaps the most attractive thing about the island, though, is the very thing that keeps the hordes away. Dominica has avoided mass tourism, and as a haven where Mother Nature is in charge, unspoilt by human hands. Having been both a French and British colony, the 70,000 or so inhabitants have various roots, including the indigenous Caribs, though the people are largely African in origin. As for visitors, they see Dominica as an unblemished alternative to the more commercial Caribbean islands. Here you can get away from the crowds, welcomed by the friendliest of local populations.

Travel Advice

Last updated: 13 March 2017

The travel advice summary below is provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the UK. 'We' refers to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. For their full travel advice, visit www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice.


Crime

Most visits are trouble-free but incidents of crime do occur.

You should maintain at least the same level of personal security awareness as you would in the UK and make sure your accommodation is secure. This also applies if you are staying on a yacht. Be vigilant at all times. Take care when walking alone off the busy main roads and avoid isolated areas, including beaches, particularly after dark.

Only use licensed taxis and take particular care at late night street parties, especially during the festival season.

Don’t carry large amounts of cash or jewellery. If possible, leave valuables and travel documents in a safety deposit box or hotel safe. You should check that the hotel safe is securely fixed before using it to store your items.

Road travel

Driving is on the left. To drive on the island you must get a local temporary driving licence. The car hire companies will usually help with this. You must present a valid UK driving licence.

Take care when driving on the roads as there can be potholes and speed bumps. Observe the speed limits. You should take extra care on minor roads and in rural areas where there are narrow roads and blind corners. Pedestrians often walk on the roads and indicators are not always used.

Take extra care when driving at night as some roads are unlit. Road signs and hazards may not be easily visible.

Take care when driving on the main road from Douglas Charles airport. This is prone to landslides following bad weather and has a number of sheer drops where the road has fallen away. Avoid driving on this road at night. Road signs are limited and a map is essential.

Don’t stop if you’re flagged down by pedestrians. Keep car doors locked when driving.

In the event of an accident, call the police and don’t move the vehicle.

Taxis aren’t metered. Standard taxi fares exist for most destinations. Agree the fare in local currency with the driver before you set off. You can often pay in US dollars as well as EC dollars.

Public transport is available at a cheaper rate. Minibus drivers might drive above the speed limit.

Swimming

Take great care at all times when swimming as currents can be deceptively strong and not all beaches have lifeguards and/or warning flags. You should monitor all beaches carefully and obey any local warnings.

Political situation

In February 2017, a protest in Dominica’s capital city, Roseau, was broken up by police. You should avoid getting caught up in any demonstrations or large public gatherings and take extra care.

Visa and passport information is updated regularly and is correct at the time of publishing. You should verify critical travel information independently with the relevant embassy before you travel.