Foreign travel advice

Luxembourg

Summary

There will be no change to the rights and status of EU nationals living in the UK, nor UK nationals living in the EU, while the UK remains in the EU.

Terrorist attacks in Luxembourg can’t be ruled out.

Around 120,000 British nationals visit Luxembourg every year (Source: STATEC (Statistics Office in Luxembourg). Most visits are trouble-free.

All vehicles must have winter tyres when temperatures are zero or below.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

Safety and security

Scams

Foreign visitors and residents can be targeted by scam artists. These can cause great financial loss. If you receive an e-mail claiming to be from Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) offering a tax refund on provision of your bank details you should make absolutely sure that it is not part of a scam.

Crime

Violent crime isn’t common in Luxembourg cities, but a higher number of burglaries have been reported by people who have recently moved into the countryside. Most crimes in these areas occur during the traditional holiday periods in August and around Christmas.

Pickpockets operate on buses and in train stations, particularly the Hammilus (main bus station) and the Luxembourg Gare (main train station) Be aware of your immediate surroundings, keep your bags within sight, and avoid displaying high value items.

Hotel lobbies, especially in the Findel area, are reported to be hot spots for thefts and pickpocketing.

Beware of bogus, plain-clothes policemen who may stop your car and ask to see your passport and/or driving licence. If you’re approached and you suspect that you are dealing with a bogus police officer, you can call 113 to check the officer’s identity.

Report any thefts in person to the nearest local police within 24 hours and get a police report crime number.

Road travel

Many of the driving rules in Luxembourg roads are different to those in the UK

  • the minimum age for driving a car is 18
  • the driver must have a valid driving licence
  • driving is on the right
  • mobile phones may only be used ‘hands free’ while driving
  • priority is given to traffic from the right in towns – drivers must stop for traffic joining from the right unless a yellow diamond sign or other priority road sign has been posted
  • you must use headlights on full-beam outside towns and cities at night and in times of low visibility

If you live in Luxembourg, you can use a valid British driving licence as long as you register it with the Ministry of Transport. Alternatively, you can exchange it for a Luxembourgish driving licence.

Keep vehicle registration and car insurance documents with you to prove you’re the legal owner and the car is properly insured. Failure to do so could lead to a fine and confiscation of the vehicle. On the spot fines are common. It’s easy to cross into neighbouring countries without realising it. Keep your passport with you for identification.

In 2013 there were 45 road deaths in Luxembourg (source: Department for Transport). This equates to 8.4 road deaths per 100,000 of population and compares to the UK average of 2.8 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2013.

All vehicles should have winter tyres when temperatures are zero or below.

Drink-drive laws are strictly enforced. You can be arrested for having a blood alcohol content of 0.05%.
See the European Commission,RAC guide on driving in Luxembourg.

Heavy goods vehicles

Heavy goods vehicles exceeding 7.5 tons, with or without a trailer, intended for the transport of goods from Belgium or Germany to France are prohibited on public roads in Luxembourg from Saturday 9:30pm to Sunday at 9:45pm, and on the days before public holidays from 9:30pm to the following day at 9:45pm.

Public transport

If you travel on public transport you must buy a ticket and validate it either on platform before your travel or on the bus. Check validation rules on the ticket before you travel. You’ll be fined on the spot if you travel without a ticket or with a ticket that hasn’t been validated.
For more detailed information, see the Angloinfo website.

Taxis

It’s safer to use official taxis (on clearly marked taxi stands). Always check the fare per km before getting in as some taxis can charge highly inflated prices. Taxi drivers charge 25% extra on Sundays.

Terrorism

Terrorist attacks in Luxembourg can’t be ruled out. Attacks could happen anywhere, including in places visited by foreigners.

There’s a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Find out more about the global threat from terrorism, how to minimise your risk and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack.

Local laws and customs

French, German and Luxembourgish are the administrative languages.

The minimum legal drinking age is 16 years, but being drunk and disorderly in public is a criminal offence that can result in arrest for a night and a heavy fine.

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Passport validity

Your passport should be valid for the proposed duration of your stay; you don’t need any additional period of validity on your passport beyond this.

Visas

If your passport describes you as a British Citizen, you don’t need a visa to enter Luxembourg. Other British passport holders should check the current entry requirements with the Embassy of Luxembourg.

You can stay in Luxembourg for up to 90 days as long as you have a valid identity card or passport.

If you plan to stay in Luxembourg for more than 90 days, you must make a declaration of arrival (déclaration d’arrivée) at the Municipal Office in your locality within 8 days. Within 3 months of arrival, you must get an address registration certificate (attestation d’enregistrement) from the Municipal Office.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents are accepted for entry and exit from Luxembourg.

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

If you’re visiting Luxembourg you should get a free European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) before leaving the UK. The EHIC isn’t a substitute for medical and travel insurance, but it entitles you to state provided medical treatment that may become necessary during your trip. Any treatment provided is on the same terms as Luxembourg nationals. If you don’t have your EHIC with you or you’ve lost it, you can call the Department of Health Overseas Healthcare Team (+44 191 218 1999) to get a Provisional Replacement Certificate. The EHIC won’t cover medical repatriation, ongoing medical treatment or non-urgent treatment, so you should make sure you have adequate travel insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment and repatriation.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. If you are referred to a medical facility for treatment you should contact your insurance/medical assistance company immediately.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. If you specifically ask for SAMU Ambulance (Service d’Aide Médicale Urgente) it means that the ambulance will come together with a doctor. If you’re referred to a medical facility for treatment you should contact your insurance/medical assistance company immediately.

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send us a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.