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World Travel Guide > Guides > Africa > Morocco > Fes

Fes Weather

25°C

Local time Fes

Currency

Dh

Things to see in Fes

Tourist Offices

Office de Tourisme

Address: Ville Nouvelle, Place Mohammed es Slaoui, Fès,
Telephone: +212 5359 30851
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0830-1630; Ramadan 0900-1500

Website: http://officetourismemaroc.com

For more information, visit the Tourism Office website. Please note that the tourism office offers no pamphlets or maps.

Attractions

Chouara Tannery

Little changed across six centuries, Fès’ pungent Chouara tanneries are the most extraordinary sight in the medina. Here, leather-workers pound hides with their feet and dip skins into honeycombed stone vats, staining their bare legs with pigment. Rooftop panoramic views of the yards are accessed through the surrounding leather shops.

Address: Fès el-Bali, Hay Lablida Chouara, Fès, 30030
Telephone: +212 664 804 050
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 0830 to 1900; mornings are the best time to see tanners at work.

Website: https://chouaratannery.com
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Kairaouine Mosque

Although non-Muslims can’t enter, sneak a peek at this venerated mosque from its main gate and appreciate the scale of the building from any lookout point. This is one of Africa’s largest mosques—but not only that, it’s one of the earliest universities in the world, first established in 857.

Address: Fès el-Bali, Qayruwan quarters, Fès, 30030
Telephone:
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Medersa Bou Inania

This beautifully restored medersa is Fès medina’s must-see sight and one of Morocco’s few religious buildings open to non-Muslims. Built between 1350 and 1357, its lavish decoration features dazzling zellig tilework and intricately carved cedar wood lintels and lattice screens, and demonstrates the high artistic accomplishments of the Merenid era.

Address: Fès el-Bali, Rue Talaa Sghira, Fès,
Telephone: +212 614 905 706
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1800.

Website:
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Mellah

The mellah, or old Jewish district, has roads are lined with dilapidated houses featuring ornate exterior balconies. Wander down Rue des Merinides to view the best examples of this architectural style. From here, visit the Synagogue Ibn-Danan, and then take a stroll in the Jewish cemetery, where you’ll find the Jewish Museum.

Address: Mellah, , Fès,
Telephone:
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Merenid Tombs

Dating from the 14th century, these ruined, tumbledown tombs sit high on the hilltop just outside the medina ramparts, looking down the walled old city below and the rolling hills beyond. It’s the best place in town to come for panoramic photos of the entire Fès el-Bali district.

Address: Borj Nord, , Fès, 30030
Telephone: +212 663 639 360
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Medersa el Attarine

Also known as Attarine Madrasa, this medersa (theological college) snuggled within the heart of the medina was founded in 1325 to house students studying at the Kairaouine Mosque. It’s known for its fusion of elaborate stucco detailing, cedar-wood carving and zellig tilework. Head up onto the rooftop for excellent views over the mosque complex itself.

Address: Fès el-Bali, Rue Talaa Kebira, Fès,
Telephone: +212 610 271 328
Opening times:

Daily 0800-1800.

Website:
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Nejjarine Museum of Wooden Arts & Crafts

This caravanserai (inn with a central courtyard) once provided shelter to traders during the 18th century and is now home to a beautiful collection of Moroccan woodcrafts, including intricately carved doors, window frames, lintels, and chests. The building itself has carefully restored carved wooden arches in the inner courtyard and is a tribute to the skill of Moroccan carpentry.

Address: Fès el-Bali, Place el-Nejjarine, Fès,
Telephone: +212 535 621 706
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1700.

Website: http://nejjarine.co.ma
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Dar Batha Museum

This 19th century palace is home to a rather dusty collection of Moroccan crafts, the highlight of which is a display of Fès ceramics. The real reason for a visit here, though, is to admire the elaborate interiors and Andalusian garden framed by a wooden arcade with preserved painted-wood ceilings.

Address: Fès el-Bali, 5 Place Batha Oued Fejjaline, Fès,
Telephone: +212 535 637 800
Opening times:

Wed-Mon 0900-1700.

Website:
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Shrine of Moulay Idriss II

Set within the medina’s tangle of lanes is this shrine dedicated to Idriss II, a revered 9th century ruler who re-founded Fès and worked to unite Morocco. Non-Muslims cannot enter this venerated shrine, but the doorway is kept open so you can glimpse the intricate finery of the entranceway.

Address: Fès el-Bali, Boutouil Kairaouine, Fès, 30030
Telephone:
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees: Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

The Royal Palace

The 17th century Royal Palace, set amid sprawling gardens, dominates the Fès el-Jedid district. It’s not open to the public (it still serves as the King of Morocco’s residence when he visits the city) but you can admire its ornate gates while walking through Place des Alaouites.

Address: Fès el-Jedid, Place des Alaouites, Fès,
Telephone:
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees: Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

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