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About St John’s

Low-lying limestone terrain cloaked in luxuriant palms is dotted with craters of volcanic origin. Warm, steady winds fan secluded, indented harbours and a protective, nearly unbroken wall of coral reef is strewn with sunken shipwrecks.

Easy-going Antigua offers numerous colourful fruit markets of papaya, coconut and pineapple on a landscape rich in the history of colonisation, slavery and the sugar trade. Former plantations remain dotted with the remnants of old stone cane-processing windmills from the era of sugar cultivation while a fine maritime heritage boasts links to Horatio Nelson, a legacy of Antigua’s role as a strategic colonial shipping hub.
Located in the Leeward Islands, Antigua forms part of a trio of isles that includes Barbuda and the tiny, uninhabited atoll of Redonda.

Sightseeing:

With a different beach for every day of the year on Antigua and further pink and white sands on Barbuda, the coves and beautiful beach stretches offer plenty of scope for lazy hammock-slung rest and relaxation. Energetic pursuits range from hiking bird-rich wildlife trails to exploring the warm, clear waters filled with tropical fish, sponges and coral.

Highlights
• Nelson’s Dockyard
• Devil’s Bridge
• Clarence House
• Dow’s Hill Interpretation Centre
• Shirley Heights
• Fort James
• St John’s Cathedral
• Indian Town

Tourist information:

Antigua and Barbuda Department of Tourism
Government Complex, Queen Elizabeth Highway, St John’s, Antigua and Barbuda
Tel: +268 462 0480.
Website: www.antigua-barbuda.org

Shopping introduction:

For a uniquely Antiguan experience, stroll the lively market in the west of St John’s on a Saturday morning to barter over spices, trinkets and crafts. Homemade straw items, pottery, batik (printed silks) and gem-set jewellery are popular local buys with international goods (such as English-bone china and Swiss watches) sold at attractive prices in the duty-free shops of the ultra-swish Heritage Quay.

Restaurants:

Antigua’s must-try national dish is fungie (pronounced ‘foon-jee’), a cornmeal dish similar to polenta. Other local specialities include pepper pot, saltfish, and ducana (sweet potato dumpling) with Antiguan confectionary – especially fudge and peanut brittle – a real sweet-toothed foodie treat. Gastronomic highlights include lobster, red snapper, roast suckling pig and pilaffs washed down with ice-cold tropical juices, coconut milk and local dark and light rums (Cavalier) or Antiguan beer (Wadadli).

When to go:

A pleasing tropical climate blesses the islands year round with warm and relatively dry weather the norm. Tropical storms and hurricanes may occur between June and November.

Nearest destination:

St John’s.

Transfer distance:

2km (1.2 miles).

Transfer time:

10 minutes.