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Things to see in Belgrade

Attractions

House of Flowers

The House of Flowers is the tomb of Josip Broz Tito, who was president of Yugoslavia from 1953 until his death in 1980. Under Tito's rule, Yugoslavia distanced itself from Stalin's Russia and followed a non-aligned version of socialism. To this day, Tito is still venerated by many. Although there is not much in the way of information about his life, there is a display of his office furniture and a larger museum showcasing the many state gifts he received. The knowledgeable staff make up for the lack of actual exhibitions with anecdotes and stories.

Address: , , ,
Telephone:
Opening times:

+381 11 3671485.

Website: http://www.mij.rs
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Kalemegdan Park

Occupying a wonderful hilltop location, overlooking the confluence of the Sava and Danube Rivers, Kalemegdan Park is a fantastic leafy outdoor space set within the walls of the Belgrade Fortress, which dates back to the Romans. The well-preserved castle is free to walk through and the surrounding park is especially appealing at sunset.

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 11 262 0685.
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website: http://www.beogradskatvrdjava.co.rs
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

National Museum

Located in a grand, Republic Square palace from 1844, this is Serbia oldest and biggest museum with nearly half a million items on display. It has everything from Ancient Greek and Roman artefacts to medieval objects which include manuscripts and icons. It is also home to an extraordinary collection of paintings from around the world, including works from Serbian and Hungarian artists.

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 11 330 6048.
Opening times:

Tue-Wed 1000-1700, Thu 1200-2000, Fri 1000-1700, Sat 1200-2000, Sun 1000-1400.

Website: http://www.narodnimuzej.rs
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Zemun

Formerly a separate town but now a suburb of Belgrade, Zemun occupies a wonderful position north of New Belgrade that overlooks the Danube River. It's actually much older than Belgrade with parts of it dating back to the 3rd century. A relaxing haven from the hustle and bustle of the city centre, Zemun's Danube riverbank here has numerous bars and cafés and some exceptional fish restaurants.

Address: , , ,
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Old bohemian quarter (Skadarlija)

Often compared to the Montmartre quarter in Paris, Belgrade's old bohemian quarter dates back to the late 19th century when its kafane (taverns and restaurants) were a meeting place for many of the greatest figures in Belgrade's cultural scene. Many famous writers, actors, painters and journalists once lived in Skadarlija, including the famous poet and painter Dura Jakšić. Today the old bohemian quarter is dotted with lively cafés, restaurants, galleries, antique shops and souvenir stalls.

Address: , , ,
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Royal Compound

Open only by appointment (weekends from 1 April to 30 October), the palaces of the Royal Compound are the official residences of the Serbian Royal Family and offer a fascinating insight into stately life. Visitors can take a guided tour around The Royal Palace, The White Palace and park of The Royal Compound on the site at leafy Dedinje Hill. Tours must be arranged through the Belgrade Tourist Organisation office at Makedonska 5.

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 11 263 5622.
Opening times:

Sat-Sun 1100-1400 (April-Oct).

Website: http://www.royalfamily.org
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

St Sava’s Temple

The imposing dome of St Sava's Temple stands at over 70m (230ft) high and can be seen from most locations throughout Belgrade. Began in 1935, it was finally completed in 2004. Dedicated to St Sava, founder of the Serbian Orthodox Church, the temple is built on the site that where his holy relics were believed to be burnt by the Ottoman ruler, Sinan Pasha, at the end of the 16th century.

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 90 314 1414.
Opening times:

Daily 0800-2100.

Website: http://www.hramsvetogsave.com
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Nikola Tesla Museum

This fascinating museum has plenty of hands-on displays and is dedicated to the life and work of eccentric Serbian physicist and inventor, Nikola Tesla. Tesla, who worked with Edison in the USA, never quite achieved the fame that he deserved despite inventing AC current and many electrical gadgets and devices.

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 11 243 3886.
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 1000-1800.

Website: http://www.tesla-museum.org
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Museum of Applied Art

Founded in 1950, this singular museum celebrates different forms of functional art, particularly of the Serbian variety. There are more than 30,000 artefacts displayed here, from coins of the Ancient Greeks in the 4th century BC, to old manuscripts, painted icons and ceramics. It also houses a number of fascinating temporary exhibitions.

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 11 262 6494.
Opening times:

Tue-Sat 1100-1900.

Website: http://www.mpu.rs
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

FC Red Star Belgrade Museum

Football is a huge passion in Belgrade with supporters divided into the two camps of Red Star Belgrade and Partisan Belgrade. Rivalry is fierce between these two teams and derby day games can be fiery affairs. There is a free museum at the Red Star stadium, which is full of football memorabilia including photographs and autographs from the 'Busby Babes' - the legendary Manchester United team who played their last game here against Red Star before their plane tragically crashed.

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 11 206 7773.
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0900-1600, Sat 0900-1400.

Website: http://www.crvenazvezdafk.com/en/stadion/muzej.html
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Tourist Offices

Belgrade Tourist Organisation

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +381 11 26 35 622.
Opening times:

Mon-Sun 0900-1900.

Website: http://www.tob.rs

This is the main Belgrade Tourist Organisation office. There are a number of offices and information centres dotted around the city, with an office at the airport and the main railway station.

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Royal

With an excellent location close to Kneza Mihala and Kalemegdan Park, this long-established budget hotel offers good-value, no-frills rooms close to the action. Receiving visitors since 1886, the welcome is still as friendly today, while the admirable onsite restaurant is quietly affordable.

Kasina

Conveniently located in the city centre across the road from the Balkan Hotel, this is a good-value option with decent rooms and its own pavement café. Built in 1856, this sizable property has plenty of history about it, and a rather decent restaurant to boot.

Le Petit Piaf

Located in the eastern part of the old city close to the bars and restaurants of the Skadarlija quarter, Le Petit Piaf is a small modern boutique hotel with plenty of character and elegant, spacious rooms.

Hotel Zira

Not far from the centre, Zira Hotel is one of the sleekest, most futuristic of properties in Belgrade. The rooms, hallways and dining area are ultra-modern, with contemporary art, plenty of space and science-fiction style design. Breakfast is of superb quality and dinner on the terrace is becoming a favourite with the city's affluent. There are 127 rooms, a fitness centre and sauna.

Union

Located in the heart of the city, the Union offers more than 100 clean and comfortable rooms in a pleasant, smart environment. If you want to splash out a little more, there are also a few luxury suites. The hotel also has a restaurant, a piano bar and even a casino.

Belgrade City Hotel

Within easy reach of the shopping district, historic centre and commercial zone, Belgrade City Hotel is a handsome 4-star property right next to the main railway station. There are more than 80 slick rooms, with warm, unpretentious décor, a great breakfast buffet and friendly staff.