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Things to see in Seville

Attractions

Plaza de España

Seville's impressive Plaza de España was built for the Ibero-American Expo of 1929 and has since become an important symbol of the city. A sprawling square borders a crescent of Renaissance and neo-Moorish buildings, sitting around an extravagant monumental fountain. A moat flows under ornate staircases and gently past a succession of brightly tiled alcoves, one for each of Spain's provinces. Besides giving a crash course in Spanish history and geography, the square also provides a beautiful setting for a day of exploration in Seville.

Address: , Plaza de España, next to Parque de Maria Luisa, Seville, ,
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

La Maestranza (Bullring)

Seville's iconic yellow-and-white bullring is considered to be one of the most important bullfighting arenas in Spain. Dating from the 17th century, the historic arena spots a Baroque exterior and an impressive acoustic system within. The bullring houses an interesting museum that displays memorabilia and artefacts dating back to the 18th century. Exhibits include costumes, bull’s heads and paintings. Bullfighting remains controversial, though tourists can still catch a live bullfight during the bullfighting season, between Easter and October.

Address: , Paseo de Colón 12, Seville, 41004 Seville
Telephone: +34 95 422 4577.
Opening times:

Daily 0930-2100 (Apr-Oct); daily 0930-1900 (Nov-Mar).

Website: http://www.realmaestranza.com
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Catedral de Sevilla & La Giralda (Seville Cathedral and bell tower)

Built in the 15th century on the foundations the Great Mosque, this gargantuan cathedral is Europe's largest gothic temple and third largest Christian church in the world. Browse the adjoining museum before heading into the impressive cathedral itself to marvel at the spectacular cloisters and stunning stained glass windows. Don’t forget to look out for the tomb of explorer Christopher Columbus who is buried here. La Giralda was the minaret of the former mosque and was once the highest tower in the world. Climb the tower’s 35 ramps to reach the top and admire the great views over Seville's rooftops and beyond.

Address: , Avenida de la Constitución, Seville, 41004 Seville
Telephone: +34 95 421 4971.
Opening times:

Mon 1100-1530, Tue-Sat 1100-1700, Sun 1430-1800.

Website: http://www.catedraldesevilla.es
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Reales Alcázares (Royal Palaces)

Dating from the 14th century, the Reales Alcazares complex provides a perfect example of Moorish architecture and houses some of the finest mudéjar artistry and the most ornate gardens in Seville. Areas worth checking out are the sprawling gardens, Jardín de las Damas, and the Moorish Patio de las Doncellas. For those looking to explore the expensive complex at a leisurely pace, expect to take a few hours to cover the whole area.

Address: , Patio de Banderas, Seville, 41004 Seville
Telephone: +34 95 450 2324.
Opening times:

Daily 0930-1700 (Oct-Mar); daily 0930-1900 (Apr-Sept).

Website: http://www.patronato-alcazarsevilla.es
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Hospital de los Venerables Sacerdotes (Hospital for the Venerable Priests)

Constructed in 1676 as a rest home for priests in the old quarter of Santa Cruz, this building is now used to promote culture in Seville. The interior patio is one of the prettiest in Andalusia, featuring beautiful uniform arched gates, a leafy garden and a pastel pink colonial exterior. For updates on cultural events in Seville, this is a place worth visiting.

Address: , Plaza de los Venerables 8, Seville, 41004 Seville
Telephone: +34 95 456 2696.
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1400 and 1600-2000.

Website: http://www.focus.abengoa.es
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Museo del Baile Flamenco

Where better to learn all about Spain’s most traditional dance than in one of the main cities of its birth? Founded by world famous flamenco dancer Cristina Hoyos, who performed at the opening of the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, the museum takes visitors on a journey through the history and various styles of the dance. Excellently laid out with vibrant displays, it combines audiovisual installations with famous flamenco dresses, shoes and art. The museum also put on highly recommended flamenco shows each night.

Address: , Manuel Rojas Marcos 3, Seville,
Telephone: +34 95 434 0311.
Opening times:

Daily 1000–1900; shows 1900-2000.

Website: http://www.museodelbaileflamenco.com
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Torre del Oro and Museo Naval (Tower of Gold and Naval Museum)

Formerly a Moorish watchtower in the early 13th century, the Torre del Oro marked the edge of Seville's defences along the banks of the Guadalquivir River. Later the tower became a storage depot for gold and riches gathered on voyages to the Americas. Today, it is an emblematic landmark of the city and it houses a small naval museum that showcases Seville’s marine history.

Address: , Paseo de Colón, Seville, 41004 Seville
Telephone: +34 95 422 2419.
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0930-1845, Sat-Sun and holidays 1030-1845.

Website:
Admission Fees:

Yes (free on Mondays).

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Isla Mágica

As a legacy of the Expo 92 trade fair, Isla Mágica is an amusement park themed around the golden days of Seville's illustrious seafaring trade. Located on the Isla de Cartuja, the theme park is best reached by car. For families with children, this is a perfect place to while away your weekend.

Address: Isla de la Cartuja, Pabellón de España, Seville, 41092 Seville
Telephone: +34 902 161 716.
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 1100-2300, Sat 1100-2400, Sun 1100-2300 (Jul-Sept); reduced days and times throughout the rest of the year.

Website: http://www.islamagica.es
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Casa de Pilatos

Dating back to the 14th century, this atmospheric mansion combines ornate Moorish architecture with elegant Italian Renaissance styles. Informative audio guides lead visitors around the property, discovering the various rooms and serene sculpted gardens. The first floor and open courtyard are reminiscent of some of the opulent rooms in Granada’s Alhambra palace, while the upper floors and gardens are filled with Roman sculptures, trickling fountains and plush furnishings.

Address: , Plaza de Pilatos 1, Seville,
Telephone: +34 95 422 5298.
Opening times:

Daily 0900–1800 (Nov–Mar); daily 0900–1900 (Apr–Oct).

Website: http://www.fundacionmedinaceli.org/monumentos/pilatos/
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Museo de Bella Artes (Museum of Fine Arts)

One of the most important art collections in Andalusia, the Seville Museum of Fine Arts features works from medieval times, through to the early 20th century, as well as paintings from the 17th century during the Golden Age of Sevillian art. Artists featured include Francisco de Herrera the younger, Murillo Zurbarán, and Valdés Leal.

Address: , Plaza del Museo 9, Seville,
Telephone: +34 95 554 2942.
Opening times:

 Tues–Sat 0900–2000, Sun 0900–1500 (16 Sep-15 Jun); Tues-Sun 1000–1500 (16 Jun–15 Sep).

Website: http://www.museodebellasartesdesevilla.es
Admission Fees:

Yes (free for EU passport holders).

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Tourist Offices

Oficina de Turismo de Sevilla

Address: , Plaza del Triunfo 1, Seville, 41004 Seville
Telephone: +34 95 421 0005.
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0900-1930, Sat-Sun 0930-1930.

Website: http://www.turismosevilla.org
A digital image at https://illuminoto.com

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Featured Hotels

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Corral del Rey

Set on a narrow street in the old town, this stylish boutique hotel is set in a 17th century palacio. The rooms are set in two buildings around a central courtyard and furnished in antiques with Moroccan touches. If you don't treat yourself to the suite with two terraces and a private plunge pool, the rooftop garden has a pool too. Downstairs, there's a tapas bar. The hotel arranges insightful tours of the city too.

Hotel Abril

Located along Calle San Jerónimo Hernández, one of the main shopping streets of Seville, Hotel Abril is a humble bolthole with reasonably good prices. Rooms are spacious and clean, with homely decor; some have windows opening into the lobby but they are quieter than those opening onto the street. For those keeping to a tight budget, free coffee and tea is available throughout the day. A hearty breakfast buffet is also available for an extra fee. All rooms are en suite and come with free Wi-Fi and air-conditioning.

YH Giralda

A former house of the abbots, the YH Giralda is a perennially popular option for young couples seeking affordable comfort. The 2-star hotel is just metres away from the Giralda, in the midst of tapas bars and shops. The tastefully-furnished rooms are small but comfortable and are all en suite. Ask for the patio-facing rooms as they are quieter than those overlooking the streets.

Hotel Boutique Elvira Plaza

This small boutique hotel - there are only nine rooms, two of them suites - is set in a charming pedestrianised square in Santa Cruz, the former Jewish district. Although the rooms are on the small size, they are light and stylish. A roof terrace looks out onto the city, and there are plenty of restaurants nearby.

Hotel Alfonso XIII

If you're looking to splurge, the Hotel Alfonso XIII is arguably one of the most prestigious hotels in Seville. Converted from a neo-Moorish palace, the hotel pays homage to Spain's past. Huge chandeliers, opulent fabrics and an exotic ambiance make it the preferred choice of the rich and famous, including foreign royalties, members of the government and celebrities. The hotel's cocktail bar is ideal for pre-prandial drinks by the pool, followed by dinner at San Fernando Restaurant or its venerable tapas lounge.

EME Catedral Hotel

Stylish and chic, the EME Catedral Hotel stands out for its juxtaposition of avant garde and rustic. Rooms are tastefully decorated with modish touches while the bricked walls and vaulted ceilings take on a rugged appearance. The rooftop swimming pool and terrace bar have spectacular views of the Cathedral, and dining options include a rustic Italian restaurant. The hotel also features glass floors that reveal Roman ruins under the hotel.