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Things to see in Nashville

Attractions

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

Boasting a large musical collection, this museum provides self-guided tours that take visitors on a chronological journey through the history of country music, from its humble beginnings to the modern days. The Studio B tour also takes you to Elvis's favourite studio, the heart of Music Row and the birthplace of the Nashville Sound.

Address: , 222 Fifth Avenue South, Tennessee,
Telephone: +1 615 416 2001
Opening times: Website: https://countrymusichalloffame.org/
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Grand Ole Opry

Grand Ole Opry began radio broadcast on 5 October 1925, making it the oldest continuous radio program in the United States. Apart from tuning in to Opry broadcast today, or streaming via its mobile app, you can also see live shows at the venue. Several tour packages are available, including backstage tour and tour that includes the Ryman Auditorium.

Address: , 2804 Opryland Dr, Tennessee,
Telephone: +1 615 871 6779
Opening times:

February to October

Website: https://www.opry.com/
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

The new Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum opened its doors in May 2001, following its re-location from Music Row to its impressive new home in the downtown entertainment district. The self-guided tour takes the visitor on a chronological journey through the history of country music, from its humble beginnings through the heyday of the Grand Ole Opry music event. The museum also boasts the Ford Theater, a 214-seat performance venue featuring a digital presentation on country music.

Address: , 222 Fifth Avenue South (corner of Demonbreun Street), Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 416 2001.
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1700.

Website: http://www.countrymusichalloffame.com
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Ryman Auditorium

One of downtown Nashville's prime attractions is the original home of the Grand Ole Opry country music event from 1943 to 1974. By day, visitors can tour the auditorium, stand on the stage and hear anecdotes from the tour guides about the country stars who played here. In the evening the venue hosts a series of concerts. Memorabilia is also on display, with some stage outfits and guitars.

Address: , 116 Fifth Avenue North, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 889 3060
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1600; evening shows vary.

Website: http://www.ryman.com
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Parthenon

This full-scale replica of Greece's most famous building was erected in 1897 to house the international art exhibition for the Centennial Exposition. It now serves as Nashville's art museum, but the real focus of the Parthenon is the gilded 13m (42ft) re-created statue of the goddess Athena. The statue took eight years to build, and while walking or driving around the Parthenon at night, you may be fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of her through rarely opened doors as an event gathers under the stunning golden sculpture.

Address: Centennial Park, West End and 25th Avenues, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 862 8431
Opening times:

Tues-Sat 0900-1630 (year round); Sun 1230-1630 (Jun-Aug).

Website: http://www.nashville.gov/Parks-and-Recreation/Parthenon.aspx
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Adventure Science Center

Need a break from country music? Adventure Science Center is an excellent alternative. There is a range of exhibitions here, all center around biology, physcis, earth and space. The venue includes a 75-foot-tall adventure tower and the Sudekum Planetarium.

Address: , 800 Fort Negley Blvd, Tennessee,
Telephone: +1 615 862 5160
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1700 (except Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and MAD Bash)

Website: http://www.adventuresci.org
Admission Fees:

 Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Gaylord Opryland Resort

decadent hotel complex houses a collection on Nashville’s biggest draws. Aside from the hotel, it boasts the Grand Ole Opry music venue and the so-cheesy-it's-cool Willie Nelson and Friends Showcase Museum (www.willienelsongeneralstore.com). It’s also the spot to see the Ernest Tubb Midnite Jamboree (www.ernesttubb.com), a long-running, midnight country radio show that records in front of a live audience from the hotel. It is a place of pilgrimage for music fans of all persuasions, and though a little out of town, it still attracts visitors in their hordes.

Address: , Opryland Drive, Nashville, ,
Telephone: +1 615 889 1000.
Opening times:

Daily 0830-2100 (Willie Nelson and Friends Showcase Museum); Sat 0000 (Ernest Tubb's Midnite Jamboree).

Website: http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/bnago-gaylord-opryland-resort-and-convention-center
Admission Fees:

Yes (Willie Nelson and Friends Showcase Museum); No (Ernest Tubb Midnight Jamboree)

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Belle Meade Plantation

The Belle Meade Plantation contains one of the oldest houses in Tennessee - a log cabin from 1790. The star attraction, however, is the 1853 Greek Revival Mansion, which has been lovingly restored to its original elegance. Other original outbuildings survive on the 12-hectare (30-acre) site, including the stables and a carriage house from the 1890s. Guides dressed in period costume give tours. There is also a visitor centre, tearoom and gift shop.

Address: , 5025 Harding Pike, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 356 0501
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1700.

Website: http://www.bellemeadeplantation.com
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Belmont Mansion

This Italianate mansion was built in 1853 by Adelicia Acklen, who at the time was one of the wealthiest women in America - thanks in part to her cotton trading with both sides during the Civil War. There are 16 rooms that are open to the public, with guided tours showing the original furniture and artworks. The grounds, now part of Belmont University, also contain a gazebo and statuary.

Address: , 1900 Belmont Boulevard, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 460 5459.
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 1000-1600, Sunday 1300-1600.

Website: http://www.belmontmansion.com
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park

This large park covers an area of 8 hectares (19 acres) to the north of the Tennessee State Capitol. The grounds contain 31 fountains (corresponding to the main rivers of Tennessee) and a vast granite map of the state. The park also has walks, a Wall of History, an amphitheatre and good views, especially leading up to the Capitol itself.

Address: , 600 James Robertson Parkway, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 741 5280.
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website: http://tnstateparks.com/parks/about/bicentennial-mall
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum

One of the Music City's newest attractions, the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum, has now found a new home at the Historic Nashville Municipal Auditorium. Owned and created by former singer/songwriter Joe Chambers, the museum honours the studio musician and features artefacts and instruments used during legendary recording sessions. It also has a 465 sq m (5,000 sq ft) performance hall, functioning recording studio and a music school, which offers lessons to students of all ages.

Address: , 401 Gay Street, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 244 3263
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 1000-1700.

Website: https://countrymusichalloffame.org/
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

The Hermitage

The Hermitage was home to America's seventh president, Andrew Jackson, and it remains Nashville's national treasure, attracting 250,000 visitors every year. Jackson first bought the property in 1804 and some of its original log cabins still survive. Rather grander is the Greek revival mansion he built in 1837, which has been fully restored, containing almost all original period furnishings. The gardens are impressive too and there is a museum on the site, as well as a restaurant and gift shop.

Address: Hermitage, 4580 Rachel's Lane, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 889 2941
Opening times:

Daily 0830-1700 (Apr-mid Oct); 0900-1630 (mid Oct-Mar).

Website: http://www.thehermitage.com
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Cheekwood

Known as Nashville's 'Home of Art and Gardens' and also the Museum of Art, Cheekwood covers a site of 22 hectares (55 acres). The three-storey Georgian-style Cheek Mansion was built in the 1930s, by a successful local businessman, Leslie Cheek, and his wife Mabel. The art collection concentrates on local artists, such as the sculptor William Edmondson, who was the first African-American to have work displayed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York back in 1937. The gardens of the estate are magnificent and include a botanic hall and woodland sculpture trail.

Address: , 1200 Forrest Park Drive, Nashville,
Telephone: +1 615 356 8000
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 0900-1700.

Website: http://www.cheekwood.org
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Tourist Offices

Visitor Information Centre

Address: , , ,
Telephone: +1 615 259 4747.
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 0800-1730, Sun 1000-1700.

Website: http://www.visitmusiccity.com

More than just a tourist office, the hub of Nashville's visitor information also works as a great spot for people watching and the best place to shop for music-themed items. Local guides speak English and Spanish, and offer a plethora of maps, advice and leaflets in a beautiful glass building. The Visitor Information Centre also displays work by local artists.

Tourist passes

Nashville Convention and Visitors Bureau (tel: +1 615 259 4747; www.visitmusiccity.com) offers a variety of passes that give discounted entry to attractions. The Music City Total Access Pass offers free entry to four of 20 participating attractions, plus admission to The Parthenon. All are available from the Visitor Information Centre, or can be purchased online or by calling +1 800 657 6910.

A digital image at https://illuminoto.com

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Featured Hotels

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The Hermitage Hotel

Built in 1910 in the beaux-arts style, this city institution is the grande dame of local hotels. Smiling after an $18million refurbishment, the lobby is gilded plaster and stained glass windows, and the all-suite guest rooms boast Florentine marble bathrooms. Dining at the hotel’s Capitol Grille evokes an elegant wine cellar, and the Oak Bar has ornate woods and plasterwork.

Loews Vanderbilt Plaza Hotel

Boasting one of the most modern looks on the Nashville hotel scene, Loews Vanderbilt Plaza has bedded many celebrities and country music stars. Artwork is a heavy motif, from the tapestries of the lobby to the in-house branch of the Kraus art gallery. The angular guest rooms are softened by plush curtains, and Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse is well regarded among local carnivores.

Days Inn Vanderbilt/Music Row

The rooms here are at least refurbished every few years to keep this good value motel at least comfortable. The property dates back to the 1960s, giving it kind of a retro cool, and the free local calls and internet don’t hurt the budget. The location is convenient, with Music Row and Vanderbilt University both within easy walking distance.

The Hutton Hotel

Opened in 2009, this property blends traditional southern touched with Manhattan-esque chic, the lobby a mix of luxuriant woods, abstract sculptures and oversized lampshades. It’s a bold attempt to steer away from the more laboured aspects of the city, and you won’t find country music being piped on repeat. The rooms are trendy but not pretentious, and the 1808 Grille brings a modern twist to down-home cooking.

Union Station

A former railway terminal is the home for this hotel, which dates back to 1900. The architecture is Romanesque-Gothic, and the property enjoyed a $10million facelift in 2007. The station’s main hall becomes a striking lobby, with vaulted stained glass ceilings. While the exterior is a National Historic Landmark, the rooms are contemporary, though light sleepers may want to avoid those that overlook the tracks.

Hilton Downtown Nashville

Another all-suite offering, this new Downtown hotel has plenty of room, with 330 units. The palm-lined atrium lobby lends a touch of sophistication to the hotel, but its main appeal is the location, within walking distance of LP Field and the Country Music Hall of Fame. The suites lend themselves to self-catered living, though there are also 3 restaurants on site.