Dance of the Lord of Death, Paro, Bhutan
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Dance of the Lord of Death, Paro, Bhutan

© Creative Commons / jmhullot

Bhutan Travel Guide

Key Facts
Area

38,364 per sq km (14,812 sq miles).

Population

725,296 (2013).

Population density

18.9 per sq km.

Capital

Thimphu.

Government

Constitutional monarchy.

Head of state

King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck since 2006.

Head of government

Prime Minister Tshering Tobgay since 2013.

Electricity

230 volts AC, 50Hz.

Closed to the outside world until the seventies, Bhutan may have opened the door to tourism, but it remains something of an enigma to modern travellers.

Nestling high up in the Himalayas, Bhutan’s mysterious reputation is thanks largely to the government, which requires all visitors to join pre-planned guided tours in a bid to limit the impact of tourism on the country's culture and environment.

On one level, this is restrictive; footloose, freewheeling, make-it-up-as-you-go trips are not an option here. The trade-off, however, is that these restrictions have preserved one of the most fascinating cultures on earth, in a pristine mountain environment that has changed little over the centuries.

To visit Bhutan every visitor, whether alone or in a group, must make all their travel arrangements through a Bhutanese tour operator, or associated organisation, and pay a fixed daily fee of US$200-250. However, before you baulk, this fee includes all meals, accommodation, transport and guides.

Having made this investment, travellers are then free to explore this mesmerising mountain kingdom, known to its people as Druk Yul, or “Land of the Thunder Dragon.”

Some tour the ancient dzongs (fortress monasteries) in the valleys surrounding the capital, Thimphu. Others seek out snow leopards and yetis – known here as migyur – in remote national parks. Those with the stamina and budget take on the legendary Snowman Trek, a 24-day odyssey over high Himalayan passes.

Wherever they go, visitors will encounter exquisite scenery and the famously friendly Bhutanese people, who, though fascinated by foreigners, remain in touch with the value, and values, of their traditional way of life.

By subscribing to a “high value, low impact” brand of tourism, Bhutan has made concessions to the modern world, but on its own terms. And that seems to be working for this magical kingdom, which regularly polls as the happiest place in Asia.

Travel Advice

Last updated: 22 May 2015

The travel advice summary below is provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the UK. 'We' refers to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. For their full travel advice, visit www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice.


Air travel

Druk Air (Royal Bhutan Airlines) is the main air carrier in and out of Bhutan. Daily air services between Paro and Bangkok are also operated by Tashi Air (Bhutan Airlines), an independent Bhutanese airline. An internal flight operated by Druk Air flies between Paro and Bumthang. Flights can be subject to disruption due to weather conditions.

Phuntsholing, Gelephu and Samdrup Jongkhar in eastern Bhutan are the only land border areas open for international tourists. You can get more information on the Tourism Council of Bhutan website.

Consular assistance

The nearest British consular office is the British Deputy High Commission in Kolkata, which should be your first point of contact for consular assistance.

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