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World Travel Guide > Guides > Africa > Mozambique

Mozambique: Doing business and staying in touch

Doing Business in Mozambique

Lightweight suits are advised. Prior appointments are recommended. A knowledge of Portuguese is normally necessary for business dealings, although there are translation facilities available in Maputo. January is the main holiday month, so this should be avoided for business trips.

Office Hours

Mon-Fri 0730-1230 and 1400-1730.

Economy

Following the civil war, the Mozambican economy picked up strongly in the late 1990s. Devastating floods, drought and trade-related disputes in the new millennium have intermittently undermined progress, and required aid donors to step in. Growth was at a healthy 7.9% in 2006, but inflation was also high at 13.2%.

In mid 2006, the World Bank relieved Mozambique from much of its long-term foreign debt burden, and remaining debts were rescheduled under the IMF's Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative.

Agriculture is the mainstay of the economy. Forestry is increasing in importance. Fishing is both an important source of food and a vital export earner. Manufacturing industry produces one quarter of GDP: products include processed foods, textiles, drinks, cement and fertiliser. Mining operations produce coal, salt, bauxite, gemstones and marble. In addition, natural gas is extracted from onshore fields and piped to South Africa.

Mozambique is a member of the Southern African Development Conference.

GDP

US$6.3 billion (2006).

Main exports

Cotton, cashew nuts, sugarcane, tea and cassava (tapioca).

Main imports

Machinery and equipment, vehicles, fuel and chemicals.

Main trading partners

Netherlands, South Africa, Portugal and Zimbabwe.

Keeping in Touch in Mozambique

Mobile Phone

Roaming agreements exist with most international mobile phone operators. Coverage is expanding to all main cities in most provinces.

Internet

There are Internet cafes in Maputo and other cities.

Post

Postal services are available in main centres. Airmail to Europe usually takes five to seven days, but sometimes longer.