Foreign travel advice

Brunei

Summary

Around 13,000 British nationals visit Brunei every year (source: Brunei Immigration). Most visits are trouble free.

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Brunei, attacks can’t be ruled out.

Crime levels are low, but there are occasional incidents of petty crime against tourists.

To contact the emergency services call Royal Brunei Police Force 993, Ambulance 991, Fire 995 or Search and Rescue 998.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. In Brunei the consular contact number is +673 2222231 option 2.

Safety and security

Crime

Crime levels are low, but there are occasional incidents of petty crime against tourists as well as house burglaries. Take particular care of your passport, avoid carrying valuables with you and do not leave possessions in unattended vehicles, even if out of sight in a locked boot.

Road travel

Drivers of vehicles not registered in Brunei can only purchase motor fuel at 10 designated filling stations throughout the country, to a maximum of 250 litres. Filling a foreign car is more expensive as the purchase price does not include a government subsidy.

You can drive in Brunei with a valid UK driving licence for up to 3 months.

Driving standards differ from the UK. Traffic will not always stop at red lights or pedestrian crossings. Speeding and non use of seatbelts is common. Road conditions are generally good but you should take extra care while driving through heavy rain as road surfaces are uneven.

If you’re involved in a road accident as a driver, you should not leave the scene or move the vehicle until the police have attended.   

Trekking

Police advise individuals against hiking alone in the forest, including at well-known recreation areas. It’s easy to get lost when visiting the rainforest. Use recognised and well-known guides, and stay on the footpaths.

Political situation

Demonstrations or large public gatherings are unlikely in Brunei. Keep yourself informed through the local media.

Local laws and customs

Local laws reflect the fact that Brunei is an Islamic country. You should dress modestly and respect local traditions, customs, laws and religions at all times, especially during the holy month of Ramadan, or if you intend to visit religious buildings.

His Majesty The Sultan and other members of the Bruneian Royal Family are highly revered and public criticism of them would cause great offence.

There may be serious penalties for doing something that might not be illegal in the UK. If you are planning to visit or live in Brunei, you are strongly advised to familiarise yourself with local laws and customs.

In 2014, Brunei began the introduction of a Sharia Penal Code, to run in parallel with the Common Law. The final phase was introduced on 3 April 2019. It specifies severe punishments for certain crimes, including some that are not illegal in the UK.

Most laws under Common Law and the Sharia Penal Code apply to all people in Brunei, regardless of nationality or religion.

Adultery and close proximity in private between an unmarried man and woman is illegal if one party is a Muslim.

Possession of pornographic material is illegal.

Homosexual activity is illegal. See our information and advice page for the LGBT community before you travel.

It is an offence to criticise Islam, and for any person to consume food, drink or tobacco in public during the fasting hours of the holy month of Ramadan. For information on travelling during Ramadan, see Travelling during Ramadan.

There are severe penalties for drug offences in Brunei including, in some cases, the death penalty. Other crimes may attract caning and lengthy prison sentences.

The sale of alcohol and tobacco in Brunei is prohibited. Non-Muslims over 17 years of age may import a limited amount of alcohol, but must declare it to the customs authorities on arrival, and must consume it in private. A list of other prohibited and restricted items is available on the Royal Customs and Excise Department’s website.

Smoking is prohibited in certain public places, including shopping and eating areas, bus stops and stations, car parks and near buildings.

Places of business and offices including shops and restaurants shut between 12 noon and 2pm every Friday.

Terrorism

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Brunei, attacks can’t be ruled out.

UK Counter Terrorism Policing has information and advice on staying safe abroad and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack. Find out more about the global threat from terrorism.

You should be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks which could be in public areas, including those frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers.

There’s a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

British Citizen passport holders may enter Brunei for up to 90 days without a visa. If you have another type of British nationality, check with Brunei immigration authorities about visa requirements.

Make sure the entry stamp in your passport indicates the validity of your stay. There are strict penalties for overstaying.

If you’re staying longer than 90 days and/or visiting for non-tourist purposes, you will need to get a visa from the nearest Brunei diplomatic mission before you travel.

Passport validity  

Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of 6 months from the date of entry into Brunei. 

Dual nationality

Brunei doesn’t recognise dual nationality. You can be refused entry if you’re found to be holding two passports of different nationality. If you’re a dual national, it’s advisable to enter Brunei on the passport on which you exited your last country of departure. While in Brunei your nationality will be deemed to be that shown on the passport which you used to enter the country. This may affect the consular assistance that you receive in Brunei.

Yellow fever certificate requirements

Check whether you need a yellow fever certificate by visiting the National Travel Health Network and Centre’s TravelHealthPro website.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency travel documents are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Brunei. They should have at least 6 months validity. You’ll have to obtain an exit and entry visa from Brunei Immigration before you travel.

Health

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the latest country-specific health advice from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) on the TravelHealthPro website. Each country-specific page has information on vaccine recommendations, any current health risks or outbreaks, and factsheets with information on staying healthy abroad. Guidance is also available from NHS (Scotland) on the FitForTravel website.

General information on travel vaccinations and a travel health checklist is available on the NHS website. You may then wish to contact your health adviser or pharmacy for advice on other preventive measures and managing any pre-existing medical conditions while you’re abroad.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or purchased in the UK can be different in other countries. If you’re travelling with prescription or over-the-counter medicine, read this guidance from NaTHNaC on best practice when travelling with medicines. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

While travel can be enjoyable, it can sometimes be challenging. There are clear links between mental and physical health, so looking after yourself during travel and when abroad is important. Information on travelling with mental health conditions is available in our guidance page. Further information is also available from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC).

Standards of healthcare in Brunei are generally acceptable, though basic hospital supplies can run low from time to time. There are two significant medical facilities, the Government General Hospital (RIPAS) in Bandar Seri Begawan and the private Jerudong Park Medical Centre (JPMC). Should complications arise, medical evacuation to Singapore may be necessary. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

Emergency dental treatment can be provided either at Jerudong Park Medical Centre (JPMC) or from local private dentists. Most branded pharmaceuticals are readily available though some items that are available without a prescription in the UK, like decongestants or anti histamines may require a Doctor’s prescription in Brunei.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 991 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Money

Credit cards are accepted at most major establishments. However, a number of shops and restaurants will only accept cash and will not have a credit card facility. Travellers’ cheques can be cashed at banks or major hotels. Singapore dollars may be used in Brunei and are of the same value as the Brunei Dollar. Most other major currencies are convertible at banks, hotels or official moneychangers.

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send the Travel Advice Team a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.