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Things to see in Delhi

Attractions

Qutab Minar

The Qutab Minar complex houses the oldest Islamic monuments in India. Built towards the end of the 12th century to commemorate the Muslim conquest of Delhi, the Qutab Minar is a grand tower that rises 72.5m (238ft) high. At its foot stands the Quwwat-ul-Islam Masjid, the first mosque to be built in India in 1193. So anxious were Delhi's new rulers to erect a mosque, they shamelessly pilfered 27 Hindu and Jain temples for building materials. Consequently, many of the pillars surrounding the courtyard are carved with Hindu iconography. In the courtyard is a 7m-high (23ft) Iron Pillar, dating back to AD375.

Address: , Qutab Minar complex, Delhi, 110030
Telephone: +91 11 2469 8431
Opening times:

Daily dawn-dusk.

Website: http://www.delhitourism.gov.in/delhitourism/tourist_place/qutab_minar.jsp
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid is India's largest mosque and is one of Shah Jahan's masterpieces. Completed in 1658, he enormous courtyard can accommodate a massive 25,000 worshippers. Visitors who climb the 122 narrow steps to the top of the southern minaret will be rewarded with magnificent views. Dress conservatively – the men renting out modesty robes at the entrance are unaffiliated hawkers, but it’s worth the small price to avoid harassment. Women may need to be accompanied by a male when climbing the minaret.

Address: , Matya Mahal, Delhi, 110006
Telephone: +91 98 9132 5429
Opening times:

Daily dawn-dusk; closed during prayer times.

Website: http://www.delhitourism.gov.in/delhitourism/tourist_place/jama_masjid.jsp
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Lal Qila (Red Fort)

Constructed by the great Mughal builder Shah Jahan between 1639 and 1648, the mammoth Red Fort in Delhi represents the peak of the Mughal dynasty's power. Today the imposing sandstone walls and battlements continue to dominate Old Delhi's skyline, but the fort is a mere shadow of its former self. The fort's main gate, Lahori Gate, so named because it faces towards Lahore now in Pakistan, was a potent symbol in the fight for independence. It continues to serve as the backdrop to the prime minister's address to the nation on Independence Day (15 August).

Address: , Lahore Gate, Delhi,
Telephone: +91 11 2327 7705
Opening times:

Tues-Sun sunrise to sunset.

Website: http://www.delhitourism.nic.in/delhitourism/tourist_place/red_fort.jsp
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Akshardham Temple

The colossal Akshardham Temple is rather inconveniently located on the city fringes but is well worth the trip - set aside at least a couple of hours. The stunning pink sandstone and marble Hindu temple, completed in 2005, incorporates an attractive mix of traditional Indian design styles including Mughal, Orissan, Rajasthani and Gujarati. The soaring domes, beautifully carved pillars and 20,000-plus carved deities are the temple's star attractions. Cameras and mobile phones are not permitted inside.

Address: near Noida Mor, National Highway 24, Delhi, 110092
Telephone: +91 11 4344 2344
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 0930-1830.

Website: http://www.akshardham.com
Admission Fees:

No (charge for exhibitions)

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

National Gallery of Modern Art

Occupying the Maharaja of Jaipur's former palace, Delhi’s National Gallery of Modern Art contains an extensive collection of contemporary Indian artwork including works by one of India's best known contemporary artists MF Husain. There are also works by painters of the Bengali Renaissance and 19th and early 20th-century paintings by British artists Thomas Daniell and his nephew William. There is also an art reference library on site. Regular special exhibitions take place in the gallery.

Address: , Jaipur House, India Gate, Delhi, 110003
Telephone: +91 11 2338 4640
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 1000-1700.

Website: http://www.ngmaindia.gov.in
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Humayun's Tomb

Beautiful Humayun's Tomb is a stunning example of Mughal architecture. Built in the mid-16th century, the tomb reflects the traditional Persian style. And though you’ll see Taj Mahal-esque forms and shapes, the use of red sandstone sets this tomb apart. The tomb is set in 12 hectares (30 acres) of gardens designed along Persian lines; shaded and geometric, criss-crossed with waterways and paths. There are other smaller tombs too, including that of the emperor's favourite barber.

Address: , Lodhi Road and Mathura Road, Delhi, 110013
Telephone: +91 11 2435 5275
Opening times:

Daily dawn-dusk.

Website: http://www.whc.unesco.org/en/list/232
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: Yes

Gandhi Smriti (Birla House)

Birla House is where Mahatma Gandhi was shot dead by a Hindu extremist on 30 January 1948. The house is now a poignant shrine to the Father of the Nation with a comprehensive indoor museum with photographs and paintings depicting Gandhi's life. Gandhi's possessions are on display in his bedroom (he had been staying at the house as a guest), and concrete footsteps trace the path of his final walk. A small pavilion, known as the Martyr's Column, marks the exact spot where he died.

Address: , 5 Tees January Marg, Delhi, 110001
Telephone: +91 11 2301 2843.
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 1000-1700.

Website: http://gandhismriti.gov.in
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Purana Qila

The crumbling remains of the Purana Qila are known as the sixth city of Delhi and represent a brief interruption in Delhi's Mughal history when the Afghan ruler Sher Shah defeated Emperor Humayun. Of the buildings still standing within this oldest known structure in Delhi, the Qila-i-Kuhna Masjid (Mosque of Sher Shah), is quite stunning. The Sher Mandal is an octagonal observatory and library. The north gate, Talaqi-Darwaza, has been partially rebuilt and gives a good impression of how formidable the fortifications would have been in their heyday.

Address: , Mathura Road, Delhi, 110003
Telephone: +91 11 2336 5358
Opening times:

Daily dawn-dusk (fortress); daily 0800-1830 (museum).

Website: http://www.delhitourism.nic.in/delhitourism/tourist_place/purana_quila.jsp
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Baha'i House of Worship

Better known as the Lotus Temple, the stunning Baha'i House of Worship was designed by Iranian-Canadian architect Fariburz Sahba in 1986 as a tribute to the lotus flower (a divine flower in many Eastern religions). Giant white petals of marble open out from nine pools and walkways in the shape of an unfolding lotus, symbolising the nine spiritual paths of the Baha'i faith. Inside, the central hall rises to a height of over 30m (98ft). Photography is not permitted inside the temple and visitors are also requested to refrain from talking. Lines may be long, and while the inside is stunning, it may be better to drive by and snap a photo, using your time to see other sites rather than waiting to enter.

Address: , Bahapur, Kalkaji, Delhi, 110019
Telephone: +91 11 2644 4029
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 0900-1900 (Apr-Sep); Tues-Sun 0900-1730 (Oct-Mar).

Website: http://www.bahaihouseofworship.in/
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

National Museum

It takes a good few hours to even skim the surface of Indian culture at Delhi’s National Museum. Highlights include excavations from Indus Valley civilisation sites, carved pillars and statues from various Indian empires, Central Asian antiquities and Tibetan manuscripts. But there's much, much more. One gallery houses over 300 musical instruments while another displays Mughal clothing, tapestries, ornaments and weapons. The admission ticket includes an informative audio-guide in English, Japanese, Hindi, German or French (you will need ID to obtain an audio-guide).

Address: , Janpath, Delhi, 110001
Telephone: +91 11 2301 9272
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 1000-1700.

Website: http://www.nationalmuseumindia.gov.in
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Rashtrapati Bhavan and Rajpath

Rajpath (Kingsway) is the grand approach to Lutyen's Delhi. Lined with trees, fountains and pools, this ceremonial boulevard hosts the colourful Republic Day parade every 26 January. At the western end stands Rashtrapati Bhavan (President's House), an immense palace originally built as the Viceroy’s residence but now the official home of the President of India. Witness the changing of the guard in the forecourt every Saturday morning. The neighbouring Mughal Gardens are open to the public on selected days in February/March. At the eastern end stands India Gate, a popular picnic spot on balmy evenings and weekends.

Address: , Rajpath, Delhi,
Telephone: +91 11 2301 5321
Opening times:

Daily dawn-dusk; President’s House:0900-1600.

Website: http://www.presidentofindia.nic.in
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

National Rail Museum

Dedicated to the remarkable story of the world's biggest railway system, Delhi’s National Rail Museum reflects the social and historic importance of what effectively bound India into a single nation. Trainspotters of all ages will love it, with its open-air display of old steam locomotives and rolling stock. Spread over 4 hectares (10 acres), this excellent museum houses 30 trains and old carriages and includes an 1855 steam engine and lavish carriages belonging to British and Indian grandees. There's a 'Joy Train' ride (great for kids), and on Sundays the Steam Mono Rail is open to all. The somewhat down-at-heel indoor gallery features train models, antique clocks, railway furniture, and historical photographs.

Address: , Chanakyapuri, Delhi,
Telephone: +91 11 2688 1826
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 0930-1730.

Website: http://www.delhitourism.gov.in/delhitourism/entertainment/national_rail_museum.jsp
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Lodhi Garden

Lodhi Garden is a romantic 90-acre public park just south of India Gate and Khan Market. Inside, you’ll find dream-like sights: quiet ponds, grassy hills and winding paths mingling around 15th-century tombs and monuments. It’s a popular spot for locals to take morning walks, and in the afternoon you’re likely to see something you won’t see almost anywhere else in India – young couples canoodling shyly under the trees.

Address: , Lodhi Road, Delhi, 110003
Telephone: +91 11 2464 0079
Opening times:

Dawn to dusk.

Website: http://www.delhitourism.gov.in/delhitourism/entertainment/lodhi_garden.jsp
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Tourist Offices

India Tourism Delhi (Government of India Tourist Office)

Address: , 88 Janpath, Delhi,
Telephone: +91 11 2332 0005
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0900-1800, Sat 0900-1400.

Website: http://www.delhitourism.gov.in

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