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World Travel Guide > Guides > Europe > Croatia > Zagreb

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Things to see in Zagreb

Tourist Offices

Zagreb Tourist Information Centre

Address: , Trg Bana J. Jelačića 11, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1 481 4051.
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0830-2000, Sat 0900-1800, Sun 1000-1600.

Website: http://www.infozagreb.hr

The main tourist office is located centrally on Trg bana Josipa Jelačića (Ban Josip Jelačić Square). There’s another tourist information office in the main railway station (tel: +385 99 210 9918), which is open Mon-Fri 0900-2100 and Sat-Sun 1000-1600.

Tourist passes

The Zagreb Card (www.zagrebcard.fivestars.hr) is a great way to save money on museum and gallery entry fees. It is available for 24or 72-hours, giving holders free travel on all public transport within Zagreb, free entry to several museums and discounts on museum and gallery entry fees. Concessions are offered in some restaurants, bars and shops too as well as car rentals. The card can be bought at the main tourist office and is widely available in hotels, bars and shops.

Attractions

Strossmajerov Šetalište (Strossmayer Promenade)

This romantic footpath offers some of the finest views over Zagreb. The 19th-century promenade was built when the old town walls were torn down, and now allows views of the lower town below as well as the Sava River beyond. Old-fashioned gas lamps illuminate the cafés and the trees shadow the benches. Look out for the sculpture of Croatian modernist poet Antun Gustav Matoš, whose silver figure by Ivan Kožarić reclines nonchalantly on a bench. The most amusing way to reach it is by funicular (from Tomićeva, just off Ilica), although it is also quite feasible to walk up.

Address: , Strossmajerov Šetalište, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Katedrala (Zagreb Cathedral)

There has been a church on this site in Zagreb since the 12th century, but today's neo-Gothic façade, complete with twin steeples, was erected after an earthquake in 1880. Soaring upwards from the square outside the church is the startling gold statue of the Madonna, with four equally vivid angels at her feet. Inside, on the north wall, note a 12th-century inscription in Glagolitic script (a predecessor to Cyrillic) and a series of 13th-century frescoes. The tomb of Archbishop Alojzije Stepinac is a source of some controversy, as he had been convicted of colluding with the Nazis during the WWII but was later exonerated by Pope John Paul II.

Address: Gornji grad, Kaptol 31, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1 481 4727.
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 1000-1700, Sun 1300-1700.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Markov Trg (St Mark's Square)

Zagreb's main square until the 19th century is home to the neoclassical Sabor (parliament) and the baroque Banski dvori (Ban's Court Palace). The centrepiece is Crkva svetog Marka (St Mark's Church), which is best known for its eccentric red, white and blue tiled roof featuring the coats of arms for Zagreb and the Kingdom of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia. This was added to the 13th-century building in 1880. Here you’ll find one of Ivan Meštrović’s most compelling works, his depiction of the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Address: Gornji grad, Crkva svetog Marka , Zagreb, 10000
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Museum of Broken Relationships

One of Zagreb’s latest museums has become a hit among visitors from all over the world. This strange and endearing collection of unlikely objects tells stories of love lost and found – from wedding dresses never worn to an axe used to chop up an ex’s furniture. Exhibits have been collected from across the globe, although many relate to the experiences of people in the region during the painful break-up of Yugoslavia in the 1990s. It’s poignant and funny at the same time, and the gift shop is worth a look for unusual souvenirs.

Address: Gornj grad, Ćirilometodska 2, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1 485 1021.
Opening times:

Mon-Sun 0900-2230 (Jun-Sep); Mon-Sun 0900-2100 (Oct-May).
 

Website: http://www.brokenships.com
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Trg Bana Jelačića (Ban Jelačić Square)

This large paved piazza has been Zagreb's main square since Donji grad came into being in the 19th century. Pedestrian-only (with the exception of trams), it's a lively public meeting place rimmed by several elegant pastel-coloured Secessionist facades and open-air cafés. The centrepiece is a bronze equestrian statue of its namesake, Ban Jelačić, the Croatian viceroy under Austro-Hungary. Temporary markets and exhibitions pop up in the centre of the square.

Address: Donji grad, Trg bana Josipa Jelačića, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Maksimir Park

East of Zagreb’s centre, the 316-hectare (780-acre) Maksimir Park dates back to the late 18th century and is the largest green space in the city. This vast expanse of lush lawns and oak woods was remodelled in 1843 with English-style landscaping that includes artificial lakes, streams, meadows and romantic follies. There is also a small zoo, a very busy café and a football stadium that’s the home of Dinamo Zagreb and the Croatian national team. As it’s only a short tram ride from the centre, it’s a popular summer spot for locals who haven’t deserted to the coast.

Address: , Maksimirski perivoj bb, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1 236 5612.
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website: http://www.park-maksimir.hr
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Meštrović Atelier

Croatia's best-known 20th-century sculptor, Ivan Meštrović, lived and worked in this 17th-century house intermittently during the 1920s. It is now a charming memorial museum, exhibiting a collection of his sculptures and sketches from the first 40 years of his life. Here you can see the plans for some of his most important projects, including the statue of Grigur of Nin, which is now by Diocletian’s Palace in Split, and the Crucifixion, which can be seen in St Mark’s Square near the museum. The works displayed here give interesting background details about much of the artist’s collection, which you’ll find scattered around the city.

Address: Gornji grad, Mletačka 8, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1 485 1123.
Opening times:

Tues-Fri 1000-1800, Sat-Sun 1000-1400.

Website: http://mestrovic.hr
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Muzej za umjetnost i obrt (Museum of Arts and Crafts)

This Zagreb museum offers a fascinating walk through the history of Croatian design, with a bit of inspiration from the British Arts and Crafts movement of the late 19th century. Furniture, ceramics, silverware, porcelain, glassware, textiles, religious art and clocks are displayed in chronological order, from the baroque period up to the industrial age. The building itself, dating from 1880, is an impressive affair and was designed by Croatian architect, Herman Bollé, who also created the elaborate Mirogoj Cemetery.

Address: Donji grad, Trg Republike Hrvatske 10, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1 488 2111.
Opening times:

Tue-Sat 1000-1900; Sun 1000-1400.

Website: http://www.muo.hr
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Zagreb City Museum

The long, tumultuous and complex history of Zagreb is detailed in a 17th-century former convent that’s not far from St Mark’s Square. Scale models of the city show the constant changes since its prehistoric foundations, through the Middle Ages, and during its time as an outpost of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Reconstructions of historic shop fronts give a taste of life in the 19th century, the time of the Croatian national revival. The period during the 1990s civil war in Yugoslavia is covered in intricate detail.

Address: Gornji grad, Opatička 20, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1 485 1361.
Opening times:

Tue-Sat 1000-1900, Sun 1000-1400.

Website: http://www.mgz.hr/en
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

The Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb

Some 12,000 artworks fill this gleaming structure across the Sava River in the Novi Zagreb district. The Museum of Contemporary Art is the biggest museum in Croatia and focuses on national artists. It also features works by Marina Abramoviċ and Max Bill, among others.

Address: Novi Zagreb, Avenija Dubrovnik 17, Zagreb, 10000
Telephone: +385 1605 2700
Opening times:

 Tue-Fri and Sun 1100-1800, Sat 1100-2000.

Website: http://www.msu.hr
Admission Fees:

 Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Zagreb 360°

To enjoy a unique panorama of Zagreb (including Kaptol, Gradec, the Upper and Lower Town), head to Zagreb 360°, located on the 16th floor of a skyscraper at Ban Josip Jelačić Square. It’s an enchanting spot to take in views of the city and the surrounding countryside. Your ticket allows multiple entries throughout the day and there’s also a café and free Wi-Fi. It’s good to come in the daylight hours for the views and return at dusk to watch the sun go down.

Address: , Ilica 1, Ban Josip Jelačić Square, Zagreb,
Telephone: +385 1 4876 587.
Opening times:

Mon 1000-1700, Tues 1400-2200, Wed and Sun 1000-2300, Thurs and Fri 1000-2345, Sat 0900-2345.

Website: http://www.zagreb360.hr
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No