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Things to see in Berlin

Tourist Offices

Visit Berlin

Address: , Parisier Platz, southern gatehouse (Brandenburg Gate), Berlin, 10117
Telephone: +49 30 250 025
Opening times:

Apr-Oct 0930-1900, Nov-Mar 0930-1800

Website: http://www.visitberlin.de

There are no less than seven tourist information offices in the city, including one at the central train station and another at Tegel Airport. Another convenient location is at Brandenburg Gate. All offer help with information, hotel bookings and tourist passes.

Tourist passes

Visitors can take advantage of the BerlinWelcome Card all inclusive (www.turbopass.de/berlin-city-pass-welcomecard-all-inclusive), which offers free entry to the city’s museums and attractions and discount deals at restaurants, shows and attractions. The BerlinWelcome Card all inclusive is optionally a travel pass with free public transport.

Attractions

Schloss Charlottenburg

The Charlottenburg Palace was built in 1699, as a summer residence for Sophie Charlotte, the wife of King Frederick III. Visits to the Old Palace are by guided tour only. Prices and hours vary for the New Wing, the Orangerie, the mausoleum and other parts of the complex. The museums and galleries that are in and around the palace include the Berggruen Collection, opposite the palace, which contains 100 artworks by Picasso, as well as a representative collection of his contemporaries.

Address: , Spandauer Damm 10-22, Berlin, 14059
Telephone: +49 30 320 910.
Opening times:

Old Palace: Tues-Sun 1000-1800 (Apr-Oct); Tues-Sun 1000-1700 (Nov-Dec).

Website: http://www.spsg.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Checkpoint Charlie Museum (Haus am Checkpoint Charlie)

Checkpoint Charlie was the monitoring tower used to control the area around the Berlin Wall that divided the city during the Cold War. It was demolished soon after the 1989 revolution, but the Haus am Checkpoint Charlie museum that stands in its place is well worth a visit to discover the historic significance of this apparently unremarkable site. A cinema shows films on the Third Reich and the Cold War era, and the museum also details the history of the Berlin Wall, a piece of which still stands a short distance from the museum, complete with decorations on the western side.

Address: , Friedrich-Straße 43-45, Berlin,
Telephone: +49 30 253 7250.
Opening times:

Daily from 0900-2200.

Website: http://www.mauer-museum.com
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas (Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe)

This extraordinary site is an unforgettable rendering of the holocaust in sculpture that never fails to impress visitors despite it looking like nothing remarkable from a distance. As you enter the enormous field of stelae, you gently descend into unseen depths through the regimented rows of the giant concrete slabs, a disorienting and disturbing experience. There's a visitor centre underneath the memorial where individual testimonies from holocaust survivors are on display, as well as a room where every known holocaust victim's name is read out on a loop lasting six years.

Address: , Cora-Berliner-Strasse 1, Berlin,
Telephone: +49 30 26 39 430.
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours (Memorial); Tue-Sun 1000-2000 (April-Sep); Tue-Sun 1000-1900 (Oct-March) (visitor centre).

Website: http://www.stiftung-denkmal.de
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Reichstag

British architect Norman Foster has transformed Berlin's Reichstag, which was built at the end of the 19th century and has long since been emblematic of the German State, but was left as a burned out husk at the end of the war. Foster's dome is meant to symbolise the transparency of the democratic government and visitors can pass between its layers to witness the decision-making chamber of the government (advance online registration is required). The walk through the dome itself is stunning, culminating in sweeping views of the city. The rooftop restaurant provides a way to beat the queues.

Address: , Platz der Republik 1, Berlin,
Telephone: +49 30 2270.
Opening times:

Daily 0800-2400 (last admission 2200).

guided tours: daily at 1030, 1330, 1530 and 1830.

Website: http://www.bundestag.de
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Brandenburger Tor (Brandenburg Gate)

Built in 1791 as a triumphal arch, the Brandenburg Gate is the only remaining town gate in the country and an enduring symbol of Berlin. Once Berlin's main avenue and still one of its best preserved historical areas, Unter den Linden ('under the lime trees') is a wide, lime tree-lined boulevard that runs from the Brandenburger Gate to Alexanderplatz, the centre of east Berlin. Along the way, the street takes in many of Berlin's real treasures, including the Deutsche Staatsoper (German State Opera), the Neue Wache (New Guardhouse), which is now a memorial to the victims of fascism and tyranny, and the Zeughaus (Arsenal), which houses the Deutsches Historisches Museum (German Historical Museum). 

Address: , Unter den Linden, Berlin,
Telephone:
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Berliner Mauer (Berlin Wall)

Only a few sections of this most famous of cold war relics remain. The East Side Gallery (www.eastsidegallery.com), along Mühlen-Strasse (S-Bahn Ostbahnhof), emerged in the post-Wall years as a poignant symbol of new hope, as it was covered with inspiring artwork. But the best place to see the wall as it was is at the Gedenkstätte Berliner Mauer, a small graffiti-free stretch of the Wall that has been preserved by the authorities. A visitor centre has information about the Wall years, while a chapel is dedicated to the 80 or so victims that died trying to cross it.

Address: , Bernauer Strasse 119, Berlin, 13355
Telephone: +49 30 467 98 66 66.
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 1000-1800 (visitors centre).

Website: http://www.berliner-mauer-gedenkstaette.de
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Berliner Dom (Berlin Cathedral)

One of the city’s grandest attractions, Berlin Cathedral is a magnificent domed building located in the charming Spree Island area. The brainchild of King Frederick William IV, the cathedral was unveiled in 1905 only to sustain heavy damage soon after in WWII. Extensive restoration work was eventually completed in 1993 and today the cathedral is one of Berlin’s top sights. You can admire its architectural splendour from the park opposite or buy a ticket and wander around the museum, chapels and Hohenzollern crypt inside. Visitors can also go to the top of the dome for stunning views over Berlin.

Address: , Am Lustgarten 1, Berlin, 10178
Telephone: +49 30 202 691 36.
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 0900-2000, Sun 0900-2000.

Website: http://www.berlinerdom.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Jüdisches Museum Berlin (Jewish Museum)

The striking design of this Daniel Libeskind-designed memorial to Jewish life in Berlin is based on a shattered Star of David. Even before the installation of the permanent exhibits (recalling the life and history of German Jews through the centuries), visitors came to experience the evocative spaces within this incredible structure. One of the most moving areas of the museum is the Holocaust Tower in which visitors enter a cold, concrete void where the only source of light, air and sound comes from small shafts at the top representing the isolation and fear of the Nazi extermination camps.

Address: , Lindenstrasse 9-14, Berlin, 10969
Telephone: +49 30 2599 3300.
Opening times:

Mon 1000-2200, Tues-Sun 1000-2000.

Website: http://www.jmberlin.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Tiergarten

There are few cities in the world where one can lie naked in the middle of town at noon and not be arrested, but Berlin is one of them. Besides having delightful tree-shaded walks, canals and flower gardens, the city’s Tiergarten park also has a couple of open fields on either side of Hofjägerallee, where the locals sunbathe au naturel.

Address: , Strasse des 17. Juni, Berlin,
Telephone:
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

DDR Museum

There was more to life in the German Democratic Republic than state surveillance, lousy cars and austere apartment blocks; what about the nudist holidays, eclectic cuisine and socialist fashion? Well, this fantastic museum forgets all about the politics to deliver a taste of everyday life in the GDR. Visitors to this hands-on museum can sit in communist cars, watch state-run TV in a socialist living room and experience the joys of GDR food in the neighbouring restaurant. 

Address: , Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 1, Berlin, 10178
Telephone:
Opening times:

Mon-Sun 1000-2000, Sat 1000-2200.

Website: http://www.ddr-museum.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No