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Things to see in Frankfurt

Tourist Offices

Tourist Information Hauptbahnhof

Address: , Hauptbahnhof, Frankfurt,
Telephone: (069) 2123 8800.
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0800-2100, Sat and Sun 0900-1800. 24/31 Dec 1000-1300.

Website: http://www.frankfurt-tourismus.de/

There are more tourist information centres located at Römerberg 27 (Mon-Fri 0930-1730, Sat and Sun 0930-1600) and at Antoniterstr. 22 (Mon-Fr 0800-1815, Sat 0800-1600). There are tourist information centres at the airport at the service points in Terminal 1 (Departure area B) and in Terminal 2 (between halls D and E). The Welcome Center in Terminal 1 (arrival area B) informs passengers about hotels and tours.

Tourist passes

The Frankfurt Card, available to groups and individuals as a one- or two-day ticket, offers free travel on all RMV transport within the city and to the airport, plus a free city map. It also includes a 20% reduction on guided city tours, 20-50% reduction on admission to major attractions and 26 museums, plus a 20% reduction on the Köln-Düsseldorfer Deutsche Rheinschiffahrt Rhine and Frankfurter Personenschifffahrt Primus-Linie river tours. There are also 15% reductions at selected theatres and 10% discounts at five Frankfurt retail locations.

The card is available from tourist information offices (tel: (069) 2123 8800), the DB Reisezentrum at the Hauptbahnhof (main railway station), and at the Frankfurt airport hotel reservations desk in terminal one. It can also be booked online via the tourist information website (see above).

Attractions

Goethe-Museum and Goethe-Haus

Completely destroyed by Allied bombers in 1944, the house where Goethe (1749-1832) was born and spent most of his youth was rebuilt after the war, in 1951, and restored to its former 18th-century glory. Visitors can see the family music room, library, living room and Goethe's own puppet show and study. 
Next door, the Goethe-Museum is home to some stunning German art, including paintings and sculptures that date from the baroque period of the 16th and 17th century, up to the romantic era of the 1800s. There are daily guided tours of the house (in German) at 1400 and 1600, and audio-visual guides are available to hire in several languages. Tours of the museum can also be arranged on request.

Address: , Grosser Hirschgraben 23-25, Frankfurt, 60311
Telephone: (069) 138 800.
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 1000-1800, Sun 1000-1730.

Website: http://www.goethehaus-frankfurt.de/
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Frankfurt Zoo

Frankfurt's zoo is one of the most attractive in Europe and is very popular with both locals and visitors. It can cram in a massive array of species, while working on breeding programmes for endangered animals such as the rusty-spotted cat, maned wolf and gorilla. Its biggest highlight is the Grzimekhaus, where artificial darkness is created in order to observe nocturnal animals going about their business. The zoo consists of 13 different areas, so visitors can see animals grouped together in similar habitats. As a children-friendly attraction, Frankfurt Zoo is a must for those travelling with kids.

Address: , Bernhard-Grzimek-Allee 1, Frankfurt, 60316
Telephone: (069) 2173 3735.
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1900 (summer); daily 0900-1700 (winter).

Website: http://www.zoo-frankfurt.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Museum für Moderne Kunst (Museum of Modern Art)

The outside of the main building of the Museum of Modern Art (MMK1) alone would count as one of the city's major attractions. A modern architectural counterpoint to Frankfurt’s superb historical buildings, the Museum of Modern Art is worth visiting to admire from the outside alone. Through the main doors, visitors are rewarded with a peerless collection of post–war art, predominantly by German and American artists. There’s work from modern masters including Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, Francis Bacon and Joseph Beuys. In addition to its vast permanent collection, the museum also plays host to a series of impressive rolling exhibitions and has an excellent cafe-restaurant for hungry visitors too. The museum has two additional exhibition sites, the MMK 2 (TaunusTurm, Taunustor 1) and the MMK 3 (Domstr. 3). 

Address: , Domstrasse 10, Frankfurt, 60311
Telephone: (069) 2123 0447.
Opening times:

MMK 1 / MMK 3: Tues-Sun 1000-1800, Wed 1000-2000.

MMK 2: Tues-Sun 1100-1800, Wed 1100-2000.

Website: http://www.mmk-frankfurt.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Städelsche Kunstinstitute und Städtische Galerie (Städel Art Institute and Municipal Gallery)

As one of Europe’s finest galleries, Städel is chock full of amazing work from down the ages. As well as showcasing German masters, such as Cranach, Holbein and Beckmann, the gallery has paintings from the likes of Botticelli, Rembrandt, Rubens and Bosch. Its Modern Art wing, which reopened in 2011, focuses on the period from 1800 to 1945 and showcases artists such as Chagall and Klee.

With over 3,000 paintings, 600 sculptures and 1,600 photos, visits can last all day. Thankfully the cafe is top drawer too, so there’s a resting place for weary feet while taking it all in.

Address: , Schaumainkai 63, Frankfurt, 60596
Telephone: (069) 605 098 232.
Opening times:

Tues-Wed 1000-1800, Thurs-Fri 1000-2100, Sat-Sun 1000-1800.

Website: http://www.staedelmuseum.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Römerberg

In 1240, this low hill was the site of the city's first official trade fair. It’s surrounded by half-timbered houses, reconstructed after they were destroyed in 1945, and the former court chapel - the Nikolaikirche (Church of St Nicholas). The main attraction, however, is the Rathaus Römer (Frankfurt's city hall since 1405) with its Gothic stepped gables made of red sandstone. The coronation of German emperors was celebrated in the Kaisersaal (Emperor's Hall) on the upper floors and portraits of 52 emperors hang on the walls. It is still a working town hall, however, so unfortunately there are no dedicated tours.

Römerberg is also home to one of Germany’s best Christmas markets, which has taken place each December since the 14th century.

Address: , Römerberg, Römer, Frankfurt,
Telephone: (069) 2123 8800.
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Senckenberg Naturmuseum (Natural History Museum)

Frankfurt’s Senckenberg Natural History Museum is the perfect spot for science fanatics and families. It has the largest exhibition of dinosaurs of any museum in Europe and over 2,000 stuffed birds to boot. For those who want to dig deeper, the museum also has displays detailing the planet's non-biological processes, including geology and meteorology, and features many rare and impressive exhibits.

An annexe behind the main building stages regular specially-themed exhibitions. There are also regular evening tours for anyone keen to spend more time learning about Germany’s fascinating natural history.

The museum will be expanded and it will feature a planetarium in the near future.

Address: , Senckenberganlage 25, Frankfurt, 60325
Telephone: (069) 75420.
Opening times:

Mon-Tues 0900-1700, Wed 0900-2000, Thurs-Fri 0900-1700, Sat and Sun 0900-1800.

Website: http://www.senckenberg.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Sankt Bartholomäusdom (Cathedral of St Bartholomew)

Between 1562 and 1792, German emperors were crowned in the Cathedral of St Bartholomew, hence its other name - the Kaiserdom (Emperor Cathedral). In the 1950s, this was Frankfurt's tallest building at 96m (315ft), which illustrates just how much the city has developed since then. The cathedral has a red sandstone facade and interior and is one of Frankfurt's most recognisable landmarks. The present structure was rebuilt after WWII but contains a number of original carvings. There are also great views of the city from the tower. A museum, the Dom-Museum, is attached to the cathedral and is packed full of ancient archaeological findings.

Address: , Domplatz 14, Frankfurt, 60311
Telephone: (069) 297 0320.
Opening times:

cathedral: Mon-Fri 0900-12, Mon and Tues 1600-1800, Wed-Thurs 1600-1700.

museum: Tues-Fri 1000-1700, Sat-Sun 1100-1700.

Website: http://www.dom-frankfurt.de
Admission Fees:

No (except for the museum)

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Historisches Museum (Historical Museum)

The Historical Museum is housed in a complex of imperial buildings on Römerberg, overlooking the Main, and also includes a 12th-century palace chapel. Completely renovated since it was reopened in 2012, the museum traces the story of Frankfurt from its place as a key regional trading city in medieval times to its destruction in the WWII. Visitors can also learn about the traditions of ebbelwei (apple wine) in the museum cafe. There are guided tours on the last Saturday of each month and a number of rotating exhibitions about the city’s cultural offerings.

Address: , Saalhof 1, Frankfurt, 60311
Telephone: (069) 2123 5599.
Opening times:

Tues-Sun 1000-1700, Wed 1000-2100.

Website: http://www.historisches-museum.frankfurt.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Jüdisches-Museum (Jewish Museum)

Until the Holocaust, Frankfurt was home to Germany's second largest Jewish population, many of whom played a key role in the city's financial and cultural success. Housed in the Rothschild Palais (a mansion that was the former home of the Rothschilds), the Jewish Museum retraces this important community’s story from the 12th to the 20th century. The remains of Mikvah (women's ceremonial baths) in the former Jewish ghetto and special exhibitions are displayed in the supplementary Judengasse Museum (Jewish Alley Museum) on Battonnstrasse 47.

The Jewish Museum at Untermainkai is closed for renovation works until 2019. Its exhibitions documenting the Jewish history until 1800 are shown in the Judengasse Museum. In 2018 the exhibitions depicting the Jewish history after 1800 will be moved to the Rothschildpalais. 

Address: , Untermainkai 14-15, Frankfurt,
Telephone: (069) 2123 5000.
Opening times:

Tues 1000-1200, Wed-Sun 1000-1800.

Website: http://www.juedischesmuseum.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Palmengarten (Palm Garden)

The Palm Garden is a wonderland of tropical plants and exotic birds. Hidden away from the bustle of central Frankfurt, the Palmengarten is the perfect place to escape the noise of the city. As the largest garden of its kind in Germany, its botanical wonders are big enough for visitors to get lost in for an entire day. Head here to find filled greenhouses, over 300 different palms and a boating lake. Concerts are staged here in summer, as well as a number of exhibitions and events. Free guided tours (in German) are available on Sundays.

Address: , Siesmayerstrasse 61, Frankfurt, 60323
Telephone: (069) 2123 3939.
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1600 (Nov-Jan); daily 0900-1800 (Feb-Oct).

Website: http://www.palmengarten.de
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Geldmuseum der Deutschen Bundesbank (Money Museum of the German Federal Bank)

Reflecting Frankfurt's central financial role both in Germany and Europe, the museum features collections of historic coinage and notes, together with explanations of the roles of money through the ages. The museum also explains the complex nature of monetary policy (especially the new European system) using films, challenging computer games and interactive teaching programmes. Guided tours available. For those who like to mix business with pleasure, there’s a good primer on complex monetary policy, as well as interactive games to keep young visitors entertained. There are also guided tours for anyone who wants to spend longer exploring the city’s historic connection with money and banking. After renovation works the museum re-opened with a new concept in December 2016. 

Address: , Wilhelm-Epstein-Strasse 14, Frankfurt, 60431
Telephone: (069) 9566 3073.
Opening times:

Mon-Tues 0900-1700, Wed 1000-2000, Thurs-Fri 0900-1700.

Website: http://www.bundesbank.de/Navigation/DE/Bundesbank/Geldmuseum/geldmuseum.html
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No