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World Travel Guide > Guides > Europe > Iceland > Reykjavik

Reykjavik Weather

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Local time Reykjavik

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Things to see in Reykjavik

Tourist Offices

Tourist Information Centre

Address: Tiarngata 11, Adalstraeti 2, Reykjavik, 101
Telephone: +354 411 6040
Opening times:

Daily 0800-2000

Website: http://www.visitreykjavik.is

Open seven days a week, Reykjavik’s small information centre is the place to go for city passes as well as tips on what to see and do.

Tourist passes

Available for 24, 48 or 72 hours, the Reykjavik City Card (www.visitreykjavik.is/travel/reykjavik-city-card) offers unlimited transport on city buses as well as admission to seven geothermal swimming pools and most of the city’s museums and galleries. It can be purchased from the Tourist Information Centre, the BSI central bus station, hotels, hostels, guesthouses, museums and tourist desks, as well as online.

Attractions

Old Harbour

Built in the early 20th century, Reykjavik’s old harbour is the starting point for whale-watching boat tours. The west side of the harbour is home to the excellent Maritime Museum, quirky Saga Museum, and Bryggjan Brugghús (an independent microbrewery), among other restaurants and cafes. On the east side corner is the very slick Harpa Concert Hall and the weekend-only Kolaportið flea market.

Address: , , Reykjavik,
Telephone:
Opening times: Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Reykjavik Maritime Museum

Visiting Iceland without learning something about its maritime tradition is like going to the UK and ignoring the royals. Housed in an old freezing plant by the harbour, the city’s marine museum charts the industry since its inception in the Viking period and contains thousands of ship and sea related artefacts – some quirky in the extreme.

Address: Miðborg, Grandagarður 8, Reykjavik, 101
Telephone: +354 411 6340.
Opening times:

Mon-Sun 1000-1700

Website: http://www.maritimemuseum.is
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Listasafn Reykjavikur (Reykjavik Art Museum)

Known collectively as the Reykjavik Art Museum and housed in three locations around the city (Harbour House or Hafnarhúsid, Ásmundur Sveinsson Sculpture Museum and the Kjarval Collection), this museum offers up a wealth of Icelandic culture. Expect changing exhibitions by Icelandic and international artists in a variety of media.

Address: Asmundarsafn, Tryggvagötu 17, Reykjavik, 101
Telephone: +354 411 6400
Opening times:

Mon-Sun 1000-1700.

Website: http://artmuseum.is
Admission Fees:

Yes (except for children under 18 and adults over 67).

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Heita Potturinn (Hot Pots)

Geothermal swimming pools and hot pots play a major part in Icelandic life. The largest in Reykjavik is Laugardalslaug, which has a 50m (150ft) pool, waterslide, five thermal pools of differing temperatures and a steam bath. Be warned: a nude shower is required before you get in.

Address: Sundlaugavegur, Laugardalur, Reykjavik, 105
Telephone: +354 411 5100.
Opening times:

Mon-Fri 0630-2200, Sat-Sun 0800-2200.

Website: http://www.visitreykjavik.is/laugardalslaug
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Volcano House

A geologically young land with 200 volcanos scattered across the country, the quintessential Iceland experience is to learn about volcanic systems and the country's geological history at the Volcano House in Reykjavík.

Address: , Tryggvagata 11, Reykjavik,
Telephone: +354 555 1900
Opening times:

Daily 1000-2200

Website: http://www.volcanohouse.is/
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Perlan (The Pearl)

Landscaped gardens, complete with artificial geyser, lead to the top of Öskjuhlíd Hill and Reykjavik's architectural masterpiece - the Pearl. This magnificent glass structure houses a restaurant and a museum, while the fourth floor boasts a viewing deck with spectacular views over Reykjavik.

Address: Hlíðar, Öskjuhlíd Hill, Reykjavik, 105
Telephone: +354 566 9000.
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1900 (museum)

Website: https://www.perlanmuseum.is/en/
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Listasafn Íslands (National Gallery of Iceland)

Iceland's National Gallery houses a permanent collection of paintings and sculpture by Icelandic and international artists from the 19th and 20th centuries. It also stages temporary exhibitions of Icelandic art. Housed in a modernist building that was originally built for ice storage, it comprises four exhibition rooms, a cafe, lecture hall, art library and bookshop.

Address: Miðborg, Fríkirkjuvegur 7, Reykjavik, 101
Telephone: +354 515 9600.
Opening times:

Tue-Sat 1000-1700 (15 May-15 Sep), Tue-Sat 1100-1700 (16 Sep-14 May).

Website: http://www.listasafn.is
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Árbæjarsafn (Árbær Open-Air Folk Museum)

Árbæjarsafn is Reykjavík's folk museum, and the largest open-air museum in Iceland. It comprises about 30 buildings dating from between 1820 and 1920. Events are scheduled every Sunday, though craftspeople are around daily and happy to demonstrate how local handicrafts are made.

Address: Stekkir, Árbæjarsafn v/Kistuhyl, Reykjavik, 110
Telephone: +354 411 6304.
Opening times:

Sept-May: daily 1300-1700, June-Aug: daily 1000-1700 

Website: http://www.minjasafnreykjavikur.is
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Thjódminjasafn Íslands (National Museum of Iceland)

Founded in 1863, the National Museum of Iceland has a huge range of relics and tools spanning 11 centuries of history. Beginning with the Viking period, it houses everything from medieval altar cloths to ancient pots, though its star attraction remains a 12th-century door depicting a Norse battle. It also hosts temporary exhibitions.

Address: Miðborg, Sudurgata 41, Reykjavik, 101
Telephone: +354 530 2200.
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1700

Website: http://www.thjodminjasafn.is
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Sigurjon Olafsson Museum

This idiosyncratic museum is devoted to the life's work of Sigurjon Olafsson, one of Iceland’s most famed artists. Alongside 80 of his sculptures, the museum showcases many of his sketches and drawings. Occasional temporary exhibitions (naturally Olafsson heavy) and regular summer concerts make this one of Reykjavik‘s most rewarding hideaways.

Address: Laugarnes, Laugarnestangi 70, Reykjavik, 105
Telephone: +354 553 2906
Opening times:

Sat-Sun 1400-1700

Website: http://www.lso.is
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Reykjavik Park and Zoo

Ideal for a family outing, the zoo has 150 animals across 19 species as well as an aquarium. The seal feeding times are particularly popular with young visitors, while a number of activities are on offer including horse riding. The adjacent Family Park is crammed with action-packed rides for children.

Address: Laugarnesvegur, Hafrafell, Reykjavik, 104
Telephone: +354 411 5900
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1800 (summer); daily 1000-1700 (winter).

Website: http://www.mu.is
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Hallgrímskirkja (Church of Hallgrímur)

Reykjavik's highest and most imposing structure, Hallgrímskirkja, is visible from over 20km (12 miles) away. Begun in the late 1940s and completed in 1986, the stark, light-filled interior of this church and its architectural resemblance to basaltic lava, elicits mixed reactions. Many visit to view the city from the tower - the panorama is superb.

Address: Miðborg, Skólavörðuholti, Reykjavik, 101
Telephone: +354 510 1000.
Opening times:

Daily 0900-2100 (church), Winter 0900-1700 (tower), Summer 0900-2100 (tower)

Website: http://www.hallgrimskirkja.is/english
Admission Fees:

No (church), Yes (charge for the tower).

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

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