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World Travel Guide > Guides > Europe > Spain > Costa Teguise beaches

About Costa Teguise beaches

The man-made resort of Costa Teguise was developed from scratch in the late 1970s, initially as a luxury holiday playground, patronised by wealthy Spanish residents and King Hussein of Jordan, and boasting projects under the influence of island design guru César Manrique. These remain but as the resort grew into a less exclusive mass-market family destination (now the second biggest on the island) so the millionaires moved on. Today Costa Teguise is a smart, popular, low-key low-rise family resort.

Beach:

Costa Teguise boasts four golden sandy beaches, the largest being the Playa de las Cucharas, renowned for windsurfing with several schools around the bay. Each July it hosts the Professional Windsurfers Association World Cup. In winter the winds drop making the waves more suitable for novices and the beach better for families. Adjacent, Playa Charcos is a smaller white-sand beach, also favoured by windsurfers. Very close by are two sheltered beaches good for smaller children. Playa Jablillo is an attractive little beach overlooked directly by a large hotel and can get crowded in high season. Playa Bastian is a bit quieter.

Beyond the beach:

Golf Costa Teguise is presently Lanzarote’s only golf club (though two others are under construction on the island). This picturesque 18-hole course is set among lava-stone cacti and some 3,000 palm trees, at the foot of a volcano, with views to the sea. A visit to the Fundación César Manrique, including César Manrique’s House, at Taro Tahiche, some 6km (4 miles) west, is highly recommended. In the midst of an utterly barren landscape an amazing home has been built underground in volcanically formed caves. The ancient town of Teguise, the original island capital, is another ‘must visit’ with the best preserved Spanish colonial architecture in the Canaries, now home to beautiful shops, art galleries, restaurants and bars. Try to come here twice; once on market day for the bustle and colour, once in the week to enjoy the peaceful town on its own terms, and to visit the Castillo de Santa Bárbara, which looms on a hill top above the town. The views are fabulous and it is home to the poignant Museum of Canarian Emigration.

Family fun:

With its choice of beaches and many activities geared for children, Costa Teguise is a very family friendly resort. Just outside the centre, AquaPark is the only water park on Lanzarote. It is more suited to younger families than thrill seekers though there are a couple of white-knuckle rides. Children will enjoy the colourful activities at Teguise Sunday market.

Exploring further:

Lanzarote is a relatively small island and from Costa Teguise anywhere is within a comfortable day trip by car. Don’t miss the volcanic landscapes of the Parque Nacional de Timanfaya, the extraordinary black lava vineyards of La Geria, the Cueva de los Verdes and do try to visit as many of César Manrique’s seven astonishingly landscaped visitor attractions as you can fit in.

Splashing out:

Dine in the La Graciosa restaurant of the Gran Meliá Salinas hotel, to get an idea of the original five-star luxury of Costa Teguise. Just outside the resort are several exceptional establishments. For that ‘wow factor’ make the short trip to Lagomar, originally the home of Omar Sharif, designed in typical Lanzarote style by island hero, César Manrique. Today it is a restaurant, bar and nightclub with a magical atmosphere built into the face of a cliff with curving whitewashed corridors linking natural caves. For a special meal visit Ikarus in Teguise for dinner in a romantic candlelit 18th-century house.