Foreign travel advice

Armenia

Summary

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The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to within 5km of the border between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the Tavush and Gegharkunik regions, and along the M16/H26 road between the towns of Ijevan and Noyemberyan.

Tensions between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh continue. The border between Armenia and Azerbaijan is closed. Several ceasefire violations along the Line of Contact separating the opposing forces and elsewhere on the inter-state border between Azerbaijan and Armenia took place in 2018, resulting in a number of deaths and casualties.

Take extra care near military emplacements and in villages and connecting roads between the main M16/H26 artery and the border to its east.

Consular support is not available in the Nagorno-Karabakh region.

Although there is no recent history of terrorism in Armenia, attacks can’t be ruled out.

The main alternative route to the M16/H26 between Armenia and Georgia (Yerevan-Vanadzor-Alaverdi-Bagratashen) is closed for maintenance work until further notice. If you’re travelling by road between Yerevan and Tbilisi you should use the M3 route from Yerevan through Tashir on the Georgian border.

Protests sometimes take place in central Yerevan and other major cities. These are usually organised by opposition political parties or activist groups highlighting topical social issues. Although protests tend to be peaceful and usually pass off without incident, you should take care, monitor the media and avoid large crowds and demonstrations.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

Safety and security

Crime

Crime levels are low. But there are occasional incidents of pick pocketing, bag snatching, theft from cars and burglary involving British or other foreign nationals. Although tourists and foreigners have not been targeted, there is a risk of being caught up in such events and you should remain vigilant at all times.

  • don’t carry your passport, credit card, travel tickets and money together.
  • leave spare cash, passports and valuables in a safe place. Always carry a copy of your passport with you but separate from other items such as credit cards.
  • take the same personal safety precautions on the street and when using ATMs as you would in the UK. 
  • take particular care if using an ATM after dark, especially if you are alone. Check no one has followed you after conducting your business.

Never part with money or share personal information including date of birth, address or financial information to someone that you have never met.

Local travel

The FCO advise against all travel within 5km of the border between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the Tavush and Gegharkunik regions, and along the M16/H26 road between the towns of Ijevan and Noyemberyan.

The border between Armenia and Azerbaijan is closed. There are frequent violations of the 1994 ceasefire between these countries from military emplacements along the border. There have been periods of increased tension which can make the security situation in border regions unpredictable.

Visitors travelling from Yerevan into Georgia should do so via the towns of Vanadzor/Alaverdi or Gyumri.

The land border with Turkey is also closed, although there are occasional direct flights between Yerevan and Istanbul.

Travelling in the South Caucasus can be unpredictable and infrastructure is sometimes in a poor state of repair. You should plan your travel carefully.

Road travel

From 28 March 2019, you will need to have a 1968 International Driving Permit (IDP) to drive in Armenia. From 1 February 2019, you can only get IDPs over the counter from 2,500 UK Post Offices. You will not be able to buy an IDP outside the UK, so get one before you travel.

The local standard of driving is poor. Be prepared for drivers who drive recklessly and flout traffic laws. Roads are in a poor state, particularly in the coldest months (November to February). If possible you should avoid driving outside of cities and towns in the dark because of the poor condition of the roads and lack of street lighting. If you are walking, be careful when crossing roads and use subways where available.

Avoid using local buses or minibuses as they are often poorly maintained and overcrowded.

Rail travel

Public transport is often overcrowded and poorly maintained. If you have to travel by train, secure your valuables, do not leave the compartment unattended, and lock the door from the inside. 

Air travel

A list of incidents and accidents in Armenia can be found on the website of the Aviation Safety network.

You can see a list of airlines banned from operating within the EU on the  European Commission website. The list is based on random inspections on aircraft of airlines that operate flights to and from EU airports. The fact that an airline is not included in the list does not automatically mean that it meets the applicable safety standards.

The FCO can’t offer advice on the safety of individual airlines. However, the International Air Transport Association publishes a list of registered airlines that have been audited and found to meet a number of operational safety standards and recommended practices. This list is not exhaustive and the absence of an airline from this list doesn’t necessarily mean that it is unsafe.

Political situation

The dispute over Nagorno-Karabakh remains unresolved. Consular support is not available in the Nagorno-Karabakh region. Although a ceasefire has been in place since May 1994, the borders between Armenia and Azerbaijan and Azerbaijani territory occupied by Armenian forces are closed.

There are no peacekeeping forces separating the sides. There are regular exchanges of sniper fire and some skirmishes. The border areas between Armenia and Azerbaijan also contain mines and unexploded ordnance. Any foreigners venturing within 5km of these borders are liable to be stopped by the police or the military.

Telephone and internet communications

Communication by telephone and e-mail can sometimes be difficult especially in the regions. Not all British mobile phones work in Armenia; check for coverage before leaving the UK if you intend to rely on it.

Access to wifi in cafes and restaurants in Yerevan is generally widespread. Outside major cities access to wifi in public places is not guaranteed. Most hotels offer a wifi service but it can sometimes be unreliable. Make sure family and friends who expect regular contact are aware of this to avoid unnecessary worry.

Terrorism

Although there is no recent history of terrorism in Armenia, attacks can’t be ruled out.

UK Counter Terrorism Policing has information and advice on staying safe abroad and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack. Find out more about the global threat from terrorism.

You should be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks, which could be in public areas including those frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers.

There’s a heightened threat of terrorist attack globally against UK interests and British nationals, from groups or individuals motivated by the conflict in Iraq and Syria. You should be vigilant at this time.

Local laws and customs

Armenia is a Christian country and women can usually dress in normal western-style clothing. Outside the capital some people can be more conservative and inappropriate dress might attract attention.

Carry a photocopy of your passport as identification at all times.

The use of illegal drugs carries stiff penalties, including fines and long prison terms. The penalty for smuggling drugs carries a prison term of between 4 to 10 years.

Homosexuality was decriminalised in 2003 but is still viewed with disapproval by many Armenians. Local LGBT groups occasionally suffer from verbal and physical harassment. Although same sex couples are often seen holding hands and kissing in public, this is common in Armenian culture, and is not necessarily an indicator of sexual orientation. You should be discreet. See our information and advice page for the LGBT community before you travel.

Don’t photograph sites such as military bases, equipment and installations. These are considered sensitive areas and visitors have been detained and questioned while attempting to photograph them.

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

As citizens of an EU member state, British Citizen passport holders can stay in Armenia without a visa up to 180 days per year.

The Armenian authorities have confirmed that after the UK leaves the EU, British Citizen passport holders will still be able to visit Armenia for up to 180 days per year without a visa.

Passport validity

Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of entry into Armenia.

Dual nationality

Under Armenian law, children who travel to Armenia on a British passport with parents who enter on an Armenian passport will require an Armenian passport to leave the country. The child may be detained on departure if he/she can’t produce one. For further details, check the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Republic of Armenia website.

Registration

If you intend to stay in Armenia longer than 180 days, you must register with the OVIR (Administration Department for Passports and Visas):

Address: Davtashen, 4th District, 31/2 Building, Yerevan, Armenia 0054

Tel: 00 374 11 361394, 00 374 11 369140

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Armenia.

Health

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the latest country-specific health advice from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) on the TravelHealthPro website. Each country-specific page has information on vaccine recommendations, any current health risks or outbreaks, and factsheets with information on staying healthy abroad. Guidance is also available from NHS (Scotland) on the FitForTravel website.

General information on travel vaccinations and a travel health checklist is available on the NHS website. You may then wish to contact your health adviser or pharmacy for advice on other preventive measures and managing any pre-existing medical conditions while you’re abroad.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or purchased in the UK can be different in other countries. If you’re travelling with prescription or over-the-counter medicine, read this guidance from NaTHNaC on best practice when travelling with medicines. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

While travel can be enjoyable, it can sometimes be challenging. There are clear links between mental and physical health, so looking after yourself during travel and when abroad is important. Information on travelling with mental health conditions is available in our guidance page. Further information is also available from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC).

The reciprocal healthcare agreement between the UK and Armenia terminated on 1 January 2016.

Medical facilities are generally poor, particularly outside Yerevan, and treatment is not recommended for anything other than minor or straightforward ailments. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 103 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Natural disasters

Armenia is in an active seismic zone. The last serious earthquake was in 1988 in the Lori region in the north. It killed between 25,000 and 50,000 people, injured thousands and left several cities in ruins.

The US Federal Emergency Management Agency has advice about what to do before, during and after an earthquake.

Money

Cash can be changed at banks and in exchange bureaux. British pounds may be less readily accepted outside Yerevan than US dollars or Euros.

Most major credit cards and UK debit cards are accepted at stores and restaurants in Yerevan but far less so outside the capital. Prices for goods and services are sometimes quoted in US dollars, but by law payment must be made in Armenian Dram.

There are many ATMs in Yerevan. They accept major credit cards and debit cards with the Maestro/Cirrus or Visa sign displayed on the card.

Travel advice help and support

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission. If you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad, contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) in London on 020 7008 1500 (24 hours).

Foreign travel checklist

Read our foreign travel checklist to help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while you’re there.

Travel safety

The FCO travel advice helps you make your own decisions about foreign travel. Your safety is our main concern, but we can’t provide tailored advice for individual trips. If you’re concerned about whether or not it’s safe for you to travel, you should read the travel advice for the country or territory you’re travelling to, together with information from other sources you’ve identified, before making your own decision on whether to travel. Only you can decide whether it’s safe for you to travel.

When we judge the level of risk to British nationals in a particular place has become unacceptably high, we’ll state on the travel advice page for that country or territory that we advise against all or all but essential travel. Read more about how the FCO assesses and categorises risk in foreign travel advice.

Our crisis overseas page suggests additional things you can do before and during foreign travel to help you stay safe.

Refunds and cancellations

If you wish to cancel or change a holiday that you’ve booked, you should contact your travel company. The question of refunds and cancellations is a matter for you and your travel company. Travel companies make their own decisions about whether or not to offer customers a refund. Many of them use our travel advice to help them reach these decisions, but we do not instruct travel companies on when they can or can’t offer a refund to their customers.

For more information about your rights if you wish to cancel a holiday, visit the Citizen’s Advice Bureau website. For help resolving problems with a flight booking, visit the website of the Civil Aviation Authority. For questions about travel insurance, contact your insurance provider and if you’re not happy with their response, you can complain to the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Registering your travel details with us

We’re no longer asking people to register with us before travel. Our foreign travel checklist and crisis overseas page suggest things you can do before and during foreign travel to plan your trip and stay safe.

Previous versions of FCO travel advice

If you’re looking for a previous version of the FCO travel advice, visit the National Archives website. If you can’t find the page you’re looking for there, send the Travel Advice Team a request.

Further help

If you’re a British national and you have a question about travelling abroad that isn’t covered in our foreign travel advice or elsewhere on GOV.UK, you can submit an enquiry. We’re not able to provide tailored advice for specific trips.