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Things to see in Prague

Tourist Offices

Pražská Informační Služba (PIS - Prague Information Service)

Address: 1, Old Town Hall, Staromìstské námìstí 1, Prague, 110 00
Telephone: 2217 14714.
Opening times:

Daily 0900-1900.

Website: http://www.prague.eu/en

The Prague Information Service can provide details on events, sightseeing, accommodation and transport. They can also book sport and concert tickets, sightseeing tours and accommodation. Come here for a free city map as well.

Tourist passes

The Prague Card (www.praguecard.com) allows unlimited travel on the metro, trams and buses. It also gives holders free access to 50 attractions, including Prague Castle, the National Museum and the Jewish Museum, plus significant discounts to 30 others. The Prague Card is available for two, three or four days.

Attractions

Malá Strana (Lesser Town)

On the west bank of the Vltava is arguably the most romantic and atmospheric district of Prague, skirting the hill of Hradčany below the castles. A craftsman's quarter during the medieval period, this district, full of palaces, embassies and fantastically ornate churches, became the home of nobles in favour with the king. It has also historically been the preferred quarter for Prague's poets, artists and musicians, and even today you’ll hear the waft of instruments as you stroll down steep, cobbled streets lined with smoky cafés, bars and hidden jazz cellars.

Address: Malá Strana, Malá Strana, Prague 1, 118 00
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Karluv Most (Charles Bridge)

The construction of Prague's most famous and photographed location began in 1357, as part of Charles IV's monumental building programme. The bridge replaced the earlier Judita Bridge, a remnant of which is the plainer of the two towers on the Malá Strana gate. The bridge itself is rather drab and it is the later statues (Jesuit additions during the Counter-Reformation), which flank the crossing, that have made it so visually stunning. The first of these (the Crucifixion) was erected in 1657, the latest not until 1928. Fully pedestrianised, this bridge is a tourist focal point, and a sunset stroll here over the rolling Vltava is one of Prague’s quintessential experiences.

Address: Staré Město (Old Town), Karluv Most, Prague, 110 00
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Pražský Hrad (Prague Castle)

Prague Castle, perched on the ridge of the Hradčany, dominates Prague's skyline. Entering under the Battling Titan statues, the complex is immediately striking. It’s almost the size of a small town with three courtyards, fortifications and gardens. Given the wealth of architecture, state apartments, churches, galleries and grounds, it is impossible to see everything in a single day. Individual attractions within the compound include the Cathedral of St Vitus (the castle’s oldest and most important site), the Old Royal Palace (former residence of Bohemian kings), Strahov Monastery, the Royal Garden and Golden Lane.

Address: Hradčany, Hradcanské námìstí, Prague 1, 119 08
Telephone: 2243 73368.
Opening times:

History buildings: daily 0900-1700 (Apr-Oct); Daily 0900-1600 (winter).

Website: http://www.hrad.cz
Admission Fees:

Yes (grounds free).

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Staroměstské Náměstí (Old Town Square)

The 12th-century Old Town Square is another focal point for tourists in Prague. In summer, tables spill out from the restaurants, while in December the square hosts the city's largest Christmas Market. All of the palaces, churches and houses around the square are of major historical interest, such as the gothic Staromestská Radnice (Old Town Hall). Its Astronomical Clock has become a must for visitors, although the spectacle doesn’t quite live up to its billing. It strikes hourly from 0900-2100, when the 15th-century upper portion reveals the Apostles at two windows. Expect large crowds in summer. Just off the square, to the east, is the superb gothic Chrám Matky Boží Před Týnem (Tyn Church), where the tomb of the astronomer Tycho Brahe is found.

Address: Staré Mĕsto (Old Town), Staroměstské Náměstí, Prague, 110 00
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Jewish Museum

Until the end of the 19th century, the area north of the Old Town Square constituted the Jewish Ghetto. Much of the area was cleared to make way for art nouveau buildings, but some of the flavour still remains. The Jewish Museum actually comprises six different historical sites around the neighbourhood, accessible on a single ticket. It allows admission to the Klausen Synagogue, the Maisel Synagogue, the Pinkas Synagogue, the utterly beautiful Spanish Synagogue, the Ceremonial Hall and the Old Jewish Cemetery. Taken together, they provide a stirring insight into this aspect of Prague’s history.

Address: Josefov, U Staré Školy 1, Prague, 110 00
Telephone: 2227 49211.
Opening times:

Sun-Fri 0900-1800 (Mar-Nov); Sun-Fri 0900-1630 (Nov-late Mar)

Website: http://www.jewishmuseum.cz
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Obecní Dùm (Municipal House)

The pinnacle of art nouveau architecture in Prague, Obecní Dùm has been fully restored to the glory of its original form. It was mainly designed by Antonin Balsánek and Osvald Polívka, although a large number of major Czech artists made contributions during its construction. The most spectacular of the public areas is the Lord Mayor's Room, which features murals by Alphonse Mucha. The restaurant, café and the Amerikanský bar were also the work of Polívka. The centrepiece of the building is the Smetana Hall, home of the Prague Symphony Orchestra and one of the major venues for concerts during the Prague Spring Festival. Guided tours are essential for visitors looking to get a proper overview.

Address: Námĕstí Republiky, Námĕstí Republiky 5, Prague 1, 111 21
Telephone: 2220 02129.
Opening times:

Guided tours take place at different times each day. Check the website for listings.

Website: http://www.obecni-dum.cz
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Muchovo Muzeum (Mucha Museum)

This intimate museum is devoted exclusively to the work of the renowned art nouveau artist Alphonse Mucha. Czech Republic’s answer to Toulouse Lautrec, Mucha is most famous for the posters he designed for theatre productions starring the great fin-de-siècle actress Sarah Bernhardt, and much of his work on exhibit here, epitomises the art nouveau aesthetic. It’s a relatively small museum, but the collection includes phenomenal paintings, posters, sketches, statues and photographs by the artist, and also features Mucha's lesser-known works celebrating pan-Slavism, as well as a recreation of his Paris studio. Guided tours are available and there’s a pleasant terrace café worth visiting too.

Address: Nové Město (New Town), Kaunický palác, Panská 7, Prague 1, 110 00
Telephone: 2242 16415.
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1800.

Website: http://www.mucha.cz
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Muzeum Komunismu (Museum of Communism)

Surrounded by Gothic spires, baroque houses and medieval streets, it’s easy to become absorbed in Prague’s ancient history, yet its most current chapters are no less fascinating or turbulent. The more recent Museum of Communism marks and explains events that occurred here under the totalitarian regime that lasted from the February coup in 1948 to its collapse in November 1989. The theme of the Museum is "Communism - the Dream, the Reality, and the Nightmare", and visitors will be treated to a fully immersive experience that even includes an Interrogation Room. The museum is guaranteed to provide a fresh and thought-provoking perspective on Prague.

Address: Na přikopě, V Celnici 1031/4, Prague 1, 110 00
Telephone: +420 224 212 966
Opening times:

Daily 0900-2100.

Website: http://www.muzeumkomunismu.cz
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Národní Muzeum (National Museum)

Národní Muzeum (National Museum) stands at the top of Wenceslas Square. Founded in 1818, it houses the country's oldest and largest collection of antiquities. However, this principal building has been closed for reconstruction since 2011, with work due to be completed in late 2018. Happily, various other sub-components of the museum remain open to visitors. These include a museum of music, a museum of natural history and a museum of Asian, African and American cultures, located in different parts of the city. When the main building reopens on Wenceslas Square, it will once again provide a striking celebration of the history of the former Czechoslovakia.

Address: Nové Město (New Town), Václavské 68, Prague 1, 115 79
Telephone: 2244 97111.
Opening times:

Wed-Mon 1000-1800 (Czech Museum of Music); Tue-Sun 1000-1800 (Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures); Daily 1000-1800(National Museum New Building); Wed-Mon 1000-1700 (Bedřich Smetana Museum); Tue-Sun 1000-1300 and 1400-1700 (Antonín Dvořák Museum); Tue-Sun 1000-1800 (Ethnographical Museum).

Website: http://www.nm.cz
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Václavské Náměstí (Wenceslas Square)

Despite its name, Wenceslas Square is really a long boulevard. In 1989, it became the focal point for the remarkable demonstrations that led to the Velvet Revolution. Today, the square is a bustling thoroughfare presenting the best and worst of post-Communist Prague - from fashionable stores to a rather seedy nightlife. Nothing remains of the square's earliest buildings, although examples of architectural styles from the last 150 years line its frontage. The lower portion is pedestrianised and contains many of Prague's largest stores. There are numerous arcades with winding passages (developed in the 1920s) and many have now been renovated to their original art deco splendour.

Address: Nové Město (New Town), Wenceslas Square, Prague 1, 110 00
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

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