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Things to see in Prague

Attractions

Malá Strana (Lesser Town)

On the west bank of the Vltava lays arguably the most romantic and atmospheric district of Prague, skirting the hill of Hradčany below the castles. A craftsman's quarter during the medieval period, this district, full of palaces, embassies and fantastically ornate churches, is perfect for night-time jaunts through its lantern-lit streets. It has also historically been the preferred quarter for Prague's poets, artists and musicians, and even today you'll hear the waft of instruments as you explore steep, cobbled alleys lined with smoky cafés, bars and hidden jazz cellars.

Address: , Malá Strana, Prague 1,
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Karlúv Most (Charles Bridge)

The construction of Prague's most famous and photographed location began in 1357, as part of Charles IV's monumental building programme. The bridge replaced the earlier Judita Bridge, a remnant of which is the plainer of the two towers on the Malá Strana gate. The bridge itself is rather drab, and it is the later statues (Jesuit additions during the Counter-Reformation), which flank the crossing, that have made it so visually stunning. Fully pedestrianised, this bridge is a tourist focal point, and a sunset stroll here over the rolling Vltava is one of Prague’s quintessential experiences.

Address: Staré Město (Old Town), Karlúv most, Prague 1, 110 00
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Pražský Hrad (Prague Castle)

Prague Castle, perched on the ridge of the Hradčany, dominates Prague's skyline. It's almost the size of a small town with three courtyards, fortifications and gardens. Given the wealth of architecture, state apartments, churches, galleries and grounds, it is impossible to see everything in a single day. Individual attractions within the compound include the Cathedral of St Vitus (the largest and most important church in Prague), the Old Royal Palace (former residence of Bohemian kings), Strahov Monastery, the Royal Garden and Golden Lane.

Address: , Hradčany, Prague 1, 119 08
Telephone: +420 2243 73368
Opening times:

History buildings: daily 1000-1800 (Apr 1-Oct 31); daily 0900-1600 (Nov 1-Mar 31).

Prague Castle complex: daily 0600 -2200 (Apr 1-Oct 31); daily 0600-2200 (Nov 1-Mar 31).

Website: http://www.hrad.cz/en/prague-castle-for-visitors
Admission Fees:

Yes (grounds free).

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Staroměstské Náměstí (Old Town Square)

The 12th-century Old Town Square is a significant and splendid focal point for tourists in Prague. In summer, tables spill out from the restaurants, while in December the square hosts the city's largest Christmas Market. All of the palaces, churches and houses around the square are of major historical interest, such as the gothic Staroměstská Radnice (Old Town Hall) and the Kinský Palace (the seat of the National Gallery). The turret of Tower Hill boasts the world-famous Astronomical Clock, which tolls hourly over the multi-coloured architectural facades. Just off the square, to the east, is the superb gothic Týnem Chrám (Týn Church), where the tomb of the astronomer Tycho Brahe is found.

Address: Staré Mĕsto (Old Town), Staroměstské Náměstí, Prague, 110 00
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Židovské Museum (Jewish Museum)

Until the end of the 19th century, the area north of the Old Town Square constituted the Jewish Ghetto. The Jewish Museum actually comprises six different historical sites around the neighbourhood, accessible on a single ticket. It allows admission to the Klausen Synagogue, the Maisel Synagogue, the Pinkas Synagogue, the utterly beautiful Spanish Synagogue (temporarily closed until the end of 2020), the Ceremonial Hall and the Old Jewish Cemetery. Taken together, they provide a stirring insight into this aspect of Prague's history.

Address: Staré Město (Old Town), U Staré Školy 141/1, Prague, 110 00
Telephone: +420 2227 49211
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 0900-1800 (Jan 1-Mar 27); 0900-1800 (Mar 29-Oct 23); 0900-1630 (Oct 25-Dec 31).

Website: http://www.jewishmuseum.cz/en/info/visit
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Obecní Dům (Municipal House)

The pinnacle of art nouveau architecture in Prague, Obecní Dùm has been fully restored to the glory of its original form. Antonin Balsánek and Osvald Polívka were its main designers, although a large number of major Czech artists made contributions during its construction. The most spectacular of the public areas is the Lord Mayor's Room, which features murals by Alphonse Mucha. The restaurant, café and the Amerikanský bar were also the work of Polívka. The centrepiece of the building is the Smetana Hall, home of the Prague Symphony Orchestra and one of the major venues for concerts during the Prague Spring Festival. Guided tours are essential for visitors looking to get a proper overview.

Address: Staré Město (Old Town), Námĕstí Republiky 5, Prague 1, 111 21
Telephone: +420 222 002 101
Opening times:

Guided tours take place at different times each day. Check the website for listings.

Website: http://www.obecnidum.cz/en
Admission Fees:

Yes.

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Muzeum Komunismu (Museum of Communism)

Prague’s ancient history lines the streets, with Gothic spires, baroque houses and medieval streets galore. Yet its most current chapters are no less fascinating or turbulent. The more recent Museum of Communism marks and explains events that occurred here under the totalitarian regime that lasted from the February coup in 1948 to its collapse in November 1989. The theme of the museum is "Communism - the Dream, the Reality, and the Nightmare", and visitors will be treated to a fully immersive experience that even includes an Interrogation Room. The museum is guaranteed to provide a fresh and thought-provoking perspective on Prague.

Address: Na přikopě, V Celnici 1031/4, Prague 1, 118 00
Telephone: +420 224 212 966
Opening times:

Daily 0900-2000.

Website: http://www.muzeumkomunismu.cz/en
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Národní Muzeum (National Museum)

Národní Muzeum (National Museum) stands at the top of Wenceslas Square. Founded in 1818, it houses the country's oldest and largest collection of antiquities. The principal building of the museum reopened in 2018 and houses items ranging from natural history to art and music. It stands as a striking celebration of the history of former Czechoslovakia. Various other sub-components of the museum are open to visitors. These include a museum of music, a museum of natural history and a museum of Asian, African and American cultures, located in different parts of the city

Address: Nové Město (New Town), Václavské Náměstí 68, Prague 1, 115 79
Telephone: +420 2244 97111
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1800 (The Historical Building of the National Museum); Wed-Mon 1000-1800 (Czech Museum of Music); Tue 1000-1800, Wed 0900-1800, Thu-Sun 1000-1800 (Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures); Daily 1000-1800 (National Museum New Building); Wed-Mon 1000-1700 (Bedřich Smetana Museum); Tue-Sun 1000-1700 (Antonín Dvořák Museum); Tue-Sun 1000-1800 (Ethnographical Museum).

Website: http://www.nm.cz/en
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Václavské Náměstí (Wenceslas Square)

Despite its name, Wenceslas Square is really a long boulevard. In 1989, it became the focal point for the remarkable demonstrations that led to the Velvet Revolution. Today, the square is a bustling thoroughfare presenting the best and worst of post-Communist Prague - from fashionable stores to a rather seedy nightlife. Nothing remains of the square's earliest buildings, although examples of architectural styles from the last 150 years line its frontage. The lower portion is pedestrianised and contains many of Prague's largest stores. There are numerous splendid art deco arcades with winding passages (developed in the 1920s).

Address: Nové Město (New Town), Wenceslas Square, Prague 1, 110 00
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Muchovo Muzeum (Mucha Museum)

This intimate museum is devoted exclusively to the work of the renowned art nouveau artist Alphonse Mucha. Czech Republic's answer to Toulouse Lautrec, Mucha is most famous for the posters he designed for theatre productions, starring the great fin-de-siècle actress Sarah Bernhardt. It's a relatively small museum, but the collection includes phenomenal paintings, posters, sketches, statues and photographs by the artist, and also features Mucha's lesser-known works celebrating pan-Slavism, as well as a recreation of his Paris studio. Guided tours are available.

Address: Nové Město (New Town), Kaunický palác, Panská 7, Prague 1, 110 00
Telephone: +420 2242 16415
Opening times:

Daily 1000-1600.

Website: http://www.mucha.cz/en
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Tourist Offices

Pražská Informační Služba (PIS - Prague Information Service)

Address: , Arbesovo nám. 70/4, Prague 5, 150 00
Telephone: +420 2217 14714
Opening times:

Mon-Thu 0800-1700, Fri 0800-1600.

Website: http://www.prague.eu/en

The Prague Information Service can provide details on events, sightseeing, accommodation and transport. They can also book sport and concert tickets, sightseeing tours and accommodation. Come here for a free city map as well.

Tourist passes

The Prague Card (www.praguecard.com) gives holders free access to 60 attractions, including Prague Castle, the National Museum and the Jewish Museum, plus significant discounts to others. It also includes free sightseeing bus tours and river cruises. The Prague Card is available for two, three or four days. Please note that since 2019, public transport is no longer included in the Prague Card and tickets have to be purchased separately.

Book Accommodation

Featured Hotels

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Jurys Inn

Near to a metro station and a 20-minutes walk to the Old Town Square, this modern hotel offers great value for money with its 214 clean and bright rooms coming in five categories - double, premium king, twin, triple and family, all of which are generously proportioned and come with free Wi-Fi. This is also a comtemporary restaurant and bar.

Four Seasons Hotel Prague

As you’d expect, Prague’s luxurious Four Seasons Hotel enjoys an unbeatable location, perched below Prague Castle and only a stone's throw from Charles Bridge. Everything here is as it should be at a Four Seasons. There are 19 suites, including the sumptuous Presidentia, furnishings are elegant and artwork original, and there’s a 24-hour concierge service, state-of-the-art gym and spa. The hotel also goes out of its way to create a child-friendly environment, with complimentary cots and a babysitting service.

Hilton Prague Old Town

The location of this hotel in Prague is spot on, only a short walk from Námìstí Republiky, the Municipal House and the beginning of the Royal Road. Guests have access to a health club, pool, gym and sauna, as well as local tennis courts and a golf course. The rooms blend state-of-the-art facilities with comfortable furnishings and contemporary styling.

Savic Hotel

Located in the Old Town Square, close to the famous astronomical clock, this Prague hotel occupies a Gothic and Renaissance building dating from 1319, a historic rarity even for Prague. Spacious rooms retain original features such as painted ceiling beams; parquet floors have been restored and all mod-cons are at hand. There's also a comfortable bar and restaurant, as well as the opportunity to relax out front on a hotel terrace in Prague's historic heart.

Florentina Ship Hotel

For great value and something completely different in Prague, you'd be hard pushed to find a better concept than this floating hotel, converted from a large river cruiser and moored at the river's edge in the middle of the Old Town for the winter season. Fully refurbished to include 54 snugly comfortably cabin rooms and a café/bar, the ship's spacious sundeck would be the perfect cocktail spot if you were paying twice the price.

Hotel Josef

This light, bright and super-modern hotel in Prague provides the perfect antidote to the heavy gothic architecture that dominates the surrounding city centre. Designed by Eva Jiricna, with a spectacular glass atrium as its focal point, the hotel's 110 luxury rooms all come with equally contemporary facilities, from high-end designer bathroom suites to Wi-Fi access.