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World Travel Guide > Guides > Europe > Norway

Norway Health Care and Vaccinations

The World Health Organisation [WHO] recommends that all travellers should be inoculated for measles, mumps, diphtheria, rubella, tetanus and polio regardless of the destination.

Title Special precautions
Malaria No
Hepatitis A No
Tetanus Yes
Diphtheria No
Rabies No
Yellow Fever No
Typhoid No

Health Care

Health risks in Norway are few, with most visitors likely to suffer nothing more serious than a few blisters from hiking or insect bites in the summer. Standards of health care are high but as with everything else in Norway, healthcare is expensive, so insurance is a must. Travellers should find out if they are covered by reciprocal health care arrangements. Australia, for example, has such an agreement as long as long as citizens carry their Medicare card. Pharmacies are called apotek and can be found on every high street. In an emergency, you can get treatment from the nearest public hospital free of charge. Dial 113 toll-free for an ambulance. Most operators also speak English.

Food and Drink

Food in Norway is safe to eat although care should be taken when purchasing food from unlicensed/roadside stalls. Norwegian tap water is safe to drink, although drinking from fjords, streams and rivers – however clean they look – isn’t recommended as even the most inviting-looking water can harbour parasites. Water that has been boiled or treated with iodine or chlorine tablets is usually safe to drink.

Other Risks

Vaccination for tick-borne encephalitis is sometimes recommended.

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