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World Travel Guide > Guides > Europe > United Kingdom > England > Weymouth beaches, Dorset

About Weymouth beaches, Dorset

The family-friendly, bucket-and-spade resort of Weymouth is set on the stunning Dorset coast. George III (the mad one) first set the trend for sea bathing here, hence it is largely a Georgian town. It’s by no means stuck in a time warp though: Weymouth’s coastal waters are thought to be some of Europe’s best for sailing, and it will be hosting the 2012 Olympic sailing events. With this in mind, the town is likely to see a lot of developments over the next few years.

Beach:

A grand sandy arc, sprinkled with deckchairs and sun loungers, Weymouth beach is everything you might expect from a venerable British seaside resort. It features soft sands, blue seas, tacky attractions, pasty or pink (depending on the weather) families, and the chance to rent a pedalo or check out a Punch and Judy show.

Beyond the beach:

A short distance west of Weymouth, Chesil Beach is a natural phenomenon – a long pebble tombolo (sandbar stretching from land to an island) that sprawls 28km (18 miles) along the coast, connecting Portland to the mainland. It also encloses the saline Fleet Lagoon, which attracts many different water birds. Strong coastal currents (this is no place to swim) mean that the smaller pebbles end up at the Bridport end with the larger deposited at the Portland end.

Family fun:

Weymouth beach is packed with seaside family entertainment, such as crazy golf and donkey rides, and there’s also an amusement park with rides. There are loads of wrecks off this coast, making it a prime area for divers. Hire equipment or get instructed at the Old Harbour Dive Centre (www.ohdc.co.uk). The coast is also ideal windsurfing territory: Second Wind (www.second-wind.co.uk) offer lessons and equipment hire. In bad weather there’s always the aquarium, the Sea Life centre (www.sealifeeurope.com), while Deep Sea Adventure (9 Custom House Quay) is a centre devoted to the history of diving and the Titanic disaster.

Exploring further:

Splashing out: