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World Travel Guide > Guides > Europe > United Kingdom > Scotland > Glasgow

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Things to see in Glasgow

Tourist Offices

VisitScotland Glasgow Information Centre

Address: , 156a-158 Buchanan Street, Glasgow, G1 2LL
Telephone: +44 141 566 4083
Opening times:

March-April: Mon-Sat: 0900-1700 and Sun: 1000-1600
May, June, September and October: Mon-Sat: 0900-1800 and Sun: 1000-1600
July and August: Mon-Sat: 0900-1900 and Sun: 1000-1700

Website: http://www.visitscotland.com/info/services/glasgow-icentre-p332751

Most attractions in Glasgow are free - you won't find all-inclusive tourist passes there. It's worth picking up a leaflet called Glasgow's Leading Attractions which has vouchers for several attractions inside, such as Willow Tea Rooms and Glasgow School of Art. It's available from the Glasgow Information Centre.

Tourist passes

There are no all-inclusive tourist passes in Glasgow.

Attractions

The Burrell Collection (Temporarily Closed until 2020)

The most famous of Glasgow's art museums, The Burrell Collection is a donation of over 8,000 works of art from shipping magnate Sir William Burrell. In addition to paintings and drawings from the 15th to 19th century, the collection includes medieval European tapestries, stained glass and sculpture, plus artworks from the Middle East and East Asia. The gallery opened in 1983 in the beautiful setting of Pollok Country Park. Also in the park is Pollok House, a Scottish country house owned by the National Trust for Scotland. A courtesy bus from Pollokshaws West Railway Station operates around the park.

Address: 2060 Pollokshaws Road, Pollok Country Park, Glasgow,
Telephone: (0141) 287 2550.
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 1000-1700, Sun 1100-1700.

Website: http://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/pages/home.aspx
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

St Mungo Museum Of Religious Life And Art and Provand’s Lordship

Opposite each other in Glasgow's Cathedral district, St Mungo, so-called after Glasgow's patron saint, is an unusual museum with two interesting galleries displaying and exhibiting the world's major religions such as a Mexican Day of the Dead skeleton and a Scottish Gallery covering religion in Scotland. The museum also has Britain's first Zen garden and top-floor views of Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis. Across the street is Provand's Lordship, built as part of a hospital in 1471. It is one of Glasgow's oldest houses, excellently preserved with original 17th-century furniture and a medicinal herb garden.

Address: , 2 Castle Street, Glasgow, G4 0RH
Telephone: +44 141 276 1629 (Museum), +44 141 276 1625 (Provand's Lordship)
Opening times:

Tues-Thurs and Sat: 1000-1700
Fri and Sun: 1100-1700

Website: http://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/venues/st-mungo-museum-of-religious-life-and-art
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Gallery of Modern Art

Centrally located in the middle of Royal Exchange Square, the Gallery of Modern Art, (GOMA), offers an up-to-date vision, showcasing the works of living artists. The gallery has an eye on the future with an excellent gift shop, cafe and art workshops – Saturday Art Club is a popular choice. The elegant, neoclassical 18th-century building itself is worth a look, a calming retreat from Glasgow's busy shopping scene. It's also worth visiting the galleries at Trongate 103, a short walk from GOMA.

Address: , Royal Exchange Square, Glasgow, G1 3AH
Telephone: +44 141 287 3050
Opening times:

Mon-Wed and Sat 1000-1700
Thurs 1000-2000
Fri and Sun 1100-1700

Website: http://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/venues/gallery-of-modern-art-goma
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Hunterian Museum

Part of the University of Glasgow, The Hunterian Museum contains over 1.3 million artefacts including Scottish mineral treasures, dinosaur and fossil exhibits, displays of world culture, and objects from Captain Cook's Pacific voyages. There are also permanent exhibitions dedicated to the Romans in Scotland, Lord Kelvin, the history of medicine in Scotland and to William Hunter, the medic and collector after whom the museum is named. Opened in 1807, The Hunterian is also Scotland's oldest public museum with one of the most extensive collections outside the National Museums.

Address: , University of Glasgow, University Avenue, Glasgow, G12 8QQ
Telephone: +44 141 330 4221
Opening times:

Tues-Sat 1000–1700
Sun 1100-1600

Website: http://www.gla.ac.uk/hunterian/
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Glasgow School of Art

The Glasgow School of Art is Charles Rennie Mackintosh's great architectural masterpiece. It is a working art school so admission is by guided tour only - advanced booking is recommended during the peak season. Led by students, the tours point out Mackintosh's architectural flourishes in the building, with access to several rooms including the library with original Mackintosh designs and the Mackintosh Room's collection of furniture. The students also run 'Glasgow Style' walking tours illustrating the contribution made by Mackintosh and his contemporaries to the art nouveau movement, and 'Glasgow Miracle' walking tours that celebrate the creative regeneration of Glasgow.

Address: , 167 Renfrew Street, Glasgow, G3 6RQ
Telephone: +44 141 353 4500
Opening times:

Tour times:
1st April-30th September: Every 30 minutes from 1030-1530 except from 1230-1300
1st October-31st March: Every 30 minutes from 1030-1530 except from 1200-1400

Website: http://www.gsa.ac.uk
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Glasgow Science Centre

Echoing the silver curves of the Clyde Auditorium's 'armadillo' design across the river, the GSC's titanium-clad shell houses the Science Mall, with over 300 hands-on exhibits covering the spectrum of natural and applied sciences, plus a planetarium. Also part of the venue is the Cineworld IMAX, Scotland's biggest IMAX. A tunnel from the GSC leads to the base of the 127m-high (417ft) Glasgow Tower, the only tower in the world that can turn 360 degrees. It is the tallest freestanding building in Scotland with stupendous views of the city from the observation level.

Address: , 50 Pacific Quay, Glasgow, G51 1EA
Telephone: +44 141 420 5000
Opening times:

27th June-2nd September: Every day from 1000-1800
3rd September-28th October: Every day from 1000-1700
29th October-25th March: Open Wed-Fri from 1000-1500 and Sat-Sun from 1000-1700Website: http://www.glasgowsciencecentre.org
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Glasgow Botanic Gardens

Visitors can get a breath of fresh air in the 20-hectares (49.5-acre) of Glasgow Botanic Gardens by the River Kelvin with its mix of formal gardens and woodland walks. It has an Arboretum with trees from around the world and themed gardens such as the Herb Garden, Children's Garden and the World Rose Garden. The Botanic Gardens are dominated by the Kibble Palace, a spectacular curvilinear glasshouse designed by John Kibble, housing a collection of tree ferns. There's a Heritage Trail between the Kelvin Walkway and the Arboretum, and a Tearoom near the Kibble Palace.

Address: , 730 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12 0UE
Telephone: +44 141 276 1614
Opening times:

Grounds:
0700-dusk

Glasshouse:
1000-1800
1000-1615 (winter)

Tearooms:
1000-1800
1000-1600 (winter)

Website: http://www.glasgowbotanicgardens.com
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

People’s Palace and Winter Gardens

An impressive building in Glasgow Green, Glasgow's oldest public space, the People's Palace tells the story of the people and city of Glasgow from 1750 to the end of the 20th century. Using historic artefacts, paintings, film, photography and interactive screens, it's an engaging insight into Glasgow's social history and how Glaswegians have lived, worked and played over the years. Exhibits include a recreated tenement flat, the Steamie where women would wash the family's clothes and a display about the high-rise Red Road flats, the adjoining Winter Gardens, a spectacular Victorian glasshouse, house exotic plants, palms, and a cafe.

Address: , Glasgow Green, Glasgow, G40 1AT
Telephone: +44 141 276 0788
Opening times:

Mon-Thurs and Sat: 1000-1700
Fri and Sun 1100-1700Website: http://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/venues/peoples-palace
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Glasgow Cathedral and the Necropolis

In the heart of the Cathedral Precinct is the Cathedral of St Mungo, founded by St Kentigern (or Mungo), the patron saint of Glasgow, in the 6th century. The Glasgow Cathedral, which dates back to the 13th century, is considered to be one of Scotland's best preserved Gothic buildings. Free guided tours are available. Across the road from the cathedral is the surreal but impressive Necropolis, a Victorian garden cemetery with some notable funerary architecture including pieces by Rennie Mackintosh and fellow Glasgow architect Alexander 'Greek' Thomson.

Address: , Castle Street, Glasgow, G4 0QZ
Telephone: +44 141 552 8198
Opening times:

October-March:Mon-Sat from 1000-1600 and Sun from 1300:1530
April-September:Mon-Sat from 0930-1730

Admissions usually close between 30 minutes to one hour before closing.

Website: http://www.glasgowcathedral.org
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Riverside Museum

Designed by architect Zaha Hadid, the state-of-the-art Riverside Museum is an award-winning museum of transport located on the banks of River Clyde, which guides visitors through the colourful history of transportation, with a focus on Glasgow. Among the collection, which spans 3,000 objects, are fire engines, trams, cars stacked up against the walls, train carriages, vehicles hovering from the mezzanine level and bikes suspended across the ceiling. Popular exhibits include a reconstructed 1900s Glasgow street and Subway station, the world's oldest surviving bicycle, and an 1886 locomotive. Among the touchscreen and hands-on exhibits are video stories of the people who used, drove and designed transport.

Address: , 100 Pointhouse Place, Glasgow, G3 8RS
Telephone: +44 141 287 2720
Opening times:

Mon-Thurs 1000-1700
Fri 1100-1700
Sat 1000-1700
Sun 1100-1700

Website: http://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/venues/riverside-museum
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

This magnificent gallery and museum in the picturesque surroundings of Kelvingrove Park in Glasgow's West End houses feature 8,000 objects in 22 themed galleries. These include European paintings by Dali, Botticelli, Titan, Monet, Rembrandt, Van Gogh, and works by Scottish Colourists and Glasgow Boys. There is a collection of Egyptian treasures, a gallery dedicated to Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Glasgow Style, a real Spitfire in the West Court, and armour, archaeology and natural history displays. Don't forget to check out Salvador Dali's Christ of St John of the Cross, an affecting vision of the crucifixion painted as if from above.

Address: Kelvingrove Park, Argyle Street, Glasgow,
Telephone: +44 141 276 9599
Opening times:

Mon-Thurs and Sat: 1000-1700
Fri and Sun: 1100-1700

Website: http://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/venues/kelvingrove-art-gallery-and-museum
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

The Lighthouse

Designed by Glasgow architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh and opened in 1895 and occupying the former Glasgow Herald Building, The Lighthouse became Scotland's Centre for Architecture and Design in 1999. With changing exhibitions and an interactive MAKLab, it also houses the permanent Mackintosh Interpretation Centre, which profiles the architect's work in the context of his contemporaries. The viewing platform of Mackintosh Tower offers terrific views over the city. Tours can be booked for an extra cost, which offer additional insight into the design and heritage of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's first public commission.

Address: , 11 Mitchell Lane, Glasgow, G1 3NU
Telephone: +44 141 276 5365
Opening times:

Mon-Sat 1030-1700
Sun 1200-1700Website: http://www.thelighthouse.co.uk
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Tenement House

For a glimpse into an authentic 19th-century Victorian tenement flat, Tenement House, owned by the National Trust of Scotland, is a restored four-room house once home to a Miss Agnes Toward for over half a century. Features include the original fitted bathroom from 1892, a bed-closet and an 1860s sewing machine. The house has authentic gas lighting, as it didn't get electric lighting until 1960. The permanent ground-floor exhibition incorporates Miss Toward's personal archive and offers a valuable insight into life in early 20th century Glasgow.

Address: , 145 Buccleuch Street, Glasgow, G3 6QN
Telephone: +44 141 333 0183
Opening times:

26th March-30th June: 1300-1700
1st July-31st August: Mon-Sat: 1100-1700 and Sun from 1300-1700
1st September-31st October: 1300-1700Website: http://www.nts.org.uk/visit/places/the-tenement-house
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

The Tallship at Riverside

Located opposite the Riverside Museum on the River Clyde, the Tall Ship at Riverside – also called the Glenlee – is one of just five Clyde built ships still afloat in the world. Visitors can explore the shop including the Captain's cabin, use the audio guides, visit the mini cinema and enjoy the under-5s play area in the cargo hold. The Tall Ship also offers maritime themed events and activities and costumed volunteer days at certain times of the year.

Address: , 150 Pointhouse Place, Glasgow, G3 8RS
Telephone: +44 141 357 3699
Opening times:

1st February-29th October: Everyday from 1000-1700
30th October-31st Jan: Everyday from 1000-1600Website: http://www.thetallship.com
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: No
UNESCO: No

Hunterian Art Gallery And Mackintosh House

The University of Glasgow's art gallery is best known for holding the world's largest permanent display of work by James McNeill Whistler. There are paintings by the Scottish Colourists and Glasgow Boys and Girls plus masterpieces by Rembrandt, Rubens, Chardin and Stubbs. It also has the largest single holding of work by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and houses The Mackintosh House, with original furniture among the reassembled interiors of the Glasgow home he shared with his artist-wife Margaret Macdonald from 1906 to 1914. Mackintosh House can only be visited on one of the free half-hour guided tours.

Address: , 82 Hillhead Street, Glasgow, G12 8QQ
Telephone: +44 141 330 4221
Opening times:

Tue-Sat: 1000-1700
Sun 1100-1600

Website: http://www.gla.ac.uk/hunterian
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No