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World Travel Guide > Guides > North America > United States of America > New York State > New York City

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Things to see in New York City

Tourist Offices

With leaflets, brochures, maps and guides, the bilingual staff at this

Address: , Macy's Herald Square, 151 West 34th Street, New York City, 10001
Telephone: +1 212 484 1222.
Opening times:

Mon–Fri, 0900–1900, Sat 1000–1900, Sun 1100–1900.

Website: http://www.nycgo.com

NYC Information Center can help plan and execute your perfect holiday. There are other tourist information centres at TKTS Plaza, Broadway at 47th Street (daily 0900–1800), at City Hall Park on the Broadway sidewalk at Park Row (Mon–Fri 0900–1800, Sat–Sun 1000–1700) and at East River Waterfront Esplanade at Pier 15 (daily 0900-1900 (May-Aug); daily 0900-1700 (Sep-Apr)).

Tourist passes

The City Pass (tel: +1 208 787 4300; www.citypass.com) offers a combined ticket to six selected New York attractions. The pass is valid for nine days and is available for purchase at any of the attractions or online.

Attractions

Statue of Liberty

The ultimate symbol of the American Dream, Lady Liberty stands majestically over New York Harbor and is probably the most famous landmark in America. The people of France donated the statue in 1886, to commemorate the alliance during the American Revolution. It was the first sight of the New World to be seen by the 12 million immigrants who passed through Ellis Island in the early and mid 20th century. Limited tickets to visit the crown are available by advance reservation.

Opened on 16 May 2019, the museum dedicated to the Statue of Liberty explains the history through multimedia displays, live performances and authentic artefacts such as the original torch.

Address: Upper New York Bay, Liberty Island, New York City, 10004
Telephone: +1 212 363 3200.
Opening times:

Daily 0830-1700 (19 Mar-27 May); daily 0830-1845 (28 May-18 Mar).

Website: http://www.nps.gov/stli
Admission Fees:

No (but there are admission fees for the ferry and crown access).

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: Yes

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) houses the most important modern art collection in the USA, covering a variety of media from the late 19th and 20th centuries to the present time, and with impressive touring exhibitions. Some of the most prominent features include a lobby that connects 53rd and 54th streets; an atrium that soars 33.5m (110ft) above street level; and innovative glass curtain walls that provide views of the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden.

Address: Midtown, 11 West 53rd Street, New York City, 10019
Telephone: +1 212 708 9400.
Opening times:

Sat-Thurs 1030-1730, Fri 1030-2000.

Website: http://www.moma.org
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Metropolitan Museum of Art

A cherished New York institution, The Met is home to more than two million works of art. It opened in 1870 with a modest collection of 174 European paintings and has grown to be the largest art museum in the western hemisphere. Now its collected works span 5,000 years of culture and the museum is home to some 2,500 of the finest paintings, including Vermeers, Rembrandts, Impressionists and Post-Impressionists as well as Renaissance, African, Asian, and Islamic art. The museum also has annexes at the Breuer (contemporary art) and the Cloisters (medieval art and architecture).

Address: Upper East Side, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York City, 10028
Telephone: +1 212 535 7710.
Opening times:

Sun-Thu 1000-1730, Fri-Sat 1000-1900.

Website: http://www.metmuseum.org
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Central Park

Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux designed this magnificent city sanctuary situated in the centre of Manhattan. It opened in 1876 and now offers numerous recreational and cultural outlets. The Belvedere Castle (a stone castle built on Vista Rock in the middle of the park at the 79th Street Transverse) offers excellent views, while the Shakespeare Garden, just west of the castle, contains flowers and herbs mentioned in the Bard's plays. There is also a theatre and sports facilities in addition to the celebrated Central Park Zoo.

Address: Uptown, From 59th Street to 110th Street, New York City,
Telephone: +1 212 310 6600.
Opening times:

Daily 0600-0100 (park); daily 1000-1700 (visitor centre).

Website: http://www.centralparknyc.org
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

National September 11 Memorial and Museum

One of New York's most evocative memorials opened on 11 September 2011, 10 years after the terrorist attack that destroyed the World Trade Center and claimed nearly 3,000 lives. Names of everyone killed that day surround two bronze reflecting pools set inside the footprints of the twin towers. A museum dedicated to the events surrounding September 11 tells the story through multimedia displays, archives and a collection of monumental and authentic artefacts.

Address: Lower Manhattan, 180 Greenwich Street, New York City, 10007
Telephone: +1 212 266 5211.
Opening times:

Daily 0730-2100 (memorial), Sun-Thurs 0900-2000, Fri-Sat 0900-2100 (museum), last entry 2 hours before closing.

Website: http://www.911memorial.org
Admission Fees:

Yes (museum)

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Empire State Building

Immortalised by Hollywood cinema, this stunning skyscraper is one of New York's most recognized buildings. Completed in 1931, the 102-storey Empire State Building is a wonderful example of art deco architecture and the observatories on the 86th and 102nd floors offer magical views of the city; the 86th floor deck is open air. Each night, the top 31 storeys are illuminated with colours that reflect a holiday, a special event or pay homage to a particular organisation.

Address: Midtown, 350 Fifth Avenue at East 34th Street, New York City, 10118
Telephone: +1 212 736 3100.
Opening times:

Daily 0800-0200.

Website: http://www.esbnyc.com
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Greenwich Village & the West Village

For much of the 20th century, Greenwich Village had a reputation as New York's bohemian district, where artists and writers would gather in salons and coffee houses. These days, well-heeled professionals rather than struggling artists live in the restored townhouses and small apartments of the Village. Christopher Street, which runs through the centre of the district, is still a lively part of New York's gay scene, whilst Bleecker Street is a good place to shop, with high-end boutiques scattered west of Seventh Avenue.

Address: Greenwich Village, Greenwich Village, New York City, 10003
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Brooklyn Bridge

Dubbed the eighth wonder of the world when it was completed after 30 years of construction in 1883, John Augustus Roebling's design remains a masterful feat of engineering. One of the world's first steel wire suspension bridges (and at one time one of the world's longest) links Manhattan with Brooklyn, over the East River. The bridge's mile-long wooden promenade, located above the car traffic, is open to pedestrians and cyclists.

Address: Civic Center Lower Manhattan & Downtown Brooklyn, Park Row (Manhattan) & Cadman Plaza (Brooklyn), New York City, 10038
Telephone:
Opening times:

Daily 24 hours.

Website:
Admission Fees:

No

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Top of the Rock

Originally inspired by the slick designs of the grand ocean liners, the Rockefeller Center's observation deck offers exceptional views. The deckchairs upon which New Yorkers once relaxed to escape the bustle below may be long gone, but the exceptional views remain. From the 70th floor, 260m (850ft) above street level, the unobstructed 360-degree vista takes in the best of the city's landmarks, including the Brooklyn Bridge, the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building and Central Park.

Address: Midtown, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City, 10112
Telephone: +1 877 692 7625.
Opening times:

Daily 0800-2400.

Website: http://www.topoftherocknyc.com
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

Solomon R Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum, a seven-storey spiral building designed by US master architect Frank Lloyd Wright, is worth visiting for the architecture alone. Opened in 1959, its design represented a new way to view art and was a radical departure. Visitors ascend to the top floor via a lift and descend at their own pace on a continuous, circular ramp. The open rotunda makes it possible to see many levels and exhibits simultaneously. The Guggenheim's acclaimed collection consists of late 19th- and 20th-century art works, many of which came from the private collection of Solomon's niece, Peggy Guggenheim.

Address: Upper East Side, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York City, 10128
Telephone: +1 212 423 3500.
Opening times:

Sun-Wed and Fri 1000-1745, Sat 1000-1945.

Website: http://www.guggenheim.org
Admission Fees:

Yes

Disabled Access: Yes
UNESCO: No

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Ye Olde Carlton Arms Hotel

A somewhat divisive 'art' hotel that lots of people really love for its location and pricing, but which you're going to dislike if you're humourless, or are a stickler for high levels of cleanliness. The rooms are individually designed with striking, and sometimes shocking, motifs, and the casual air recalls a backpacker's hostel but with individual rooms. Bohemian, definitely.

Lowell Hotel

New York hotels don't come too much classier than this 1927 landmark building, set on a leafy street in one of the Upper East Side's most fashionable spots. Discreet and aristocratic, the liveried doormen escort you to opulent rooms crammed with period furniture and antique décor. It manages to retain an understated air, though, and is the ultimate retreat for those that can afford it.

The Greenwich Hotel

This hip downtown spot fills a renovated historic building in the Tribeca neighbourhood. From the eclectic lobby with its comfy chairs and imported Moroccan screens, to the luxurious bathrooms featuring Carrara marble and hand-laid Turkish tiles, you'll feel a rich combination of style and decadence.

Crosby Street Hotel

This chic downtown hotel features 86 individually designed guestrooms and suites, all with floor-to-ceiling windows, original artwork and a stylish contemporary design. Guests also enjoy the leafy garden, the private screening room and a whimsically designed bar. The hotel is beautifully located on a cobblestone street just a short stroll from the great dining and shopping in Soho and Nolita.

The Gershwin

Not far from the much-photographed Flatiron Building is The Evelyn, set in a historic building that has housed one hotel after the other since 1905. Recently renovated rooms feature soft cocoa colour schemes, crisp white linens and spacious bathrooms, and the location is superbly central.

NobleDen

This sleek, contemporary hotel is well located in Little Italy, at the border with Chinatown, and boasts relatively spacious (for New York) guestrooms with hardwood floors, patterned walls and large flat-screen TVs. There's a rooftop terrace with great views, and an Asian restaurant downstairs.