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Romania Health Care and Vaccinations

* Vaccination advised for those at high risk or visiting rural areas.

Title Special precautions
Yellow Fever No
Typhoid Yes
Tetanus Yes
Rabies Sometimes*
Malaria No
Hepatitis A Yes
Diphtheria Yes

Health Care

Medical facilities in Romania are poor and there is a serious shortage of basic medical supplies and qualified personnel. Take particular care if travelling in rural areas, as there have been cases of hepatitis B and HIV transmission through insufficiently sterilised equipment. If necessary, your local embassy or consulate should be able to recommend a physician. European travellers carrying the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) are entitled to free or reduced cost medical care. In the UK, these are available from health centres or via the Department of Health (www.dh.gov.uk). Nationals of countries who do not have a reciprocal health agreement with Romania are expected to pay immediate cash for health services. Health insurance is strongly advised.

Food and Drink

Mains water is normally chlorinated, and whilst relatively safe, may cause abdominal upsets; bottled water is available. Milk is pasteurised and dairy products are safe for consumption. Local meat, poultry, seafood, fruit and vegetables are generally considered safe to eat.

Other Risks

Hepatitis C and tuberculosis occur and hepatitis B is endemic. Stray dogs may carry the tick-borne African typhus disease and rabies is also present. If bitten, seek medical advice without delay. There have been confirmed outbreaks of avian influenza (bird flu) in the Danube Delta, Transylvania and Bucharest. The Romanian authorities have taken measures to contain the outbreaks and no human infections or deaths have been reported. In 2012, several cases of the West Nile Virus were reported by the Romanian National Institute of Health, and travellers to the Danube Delta are recommended to wear long-sleeved shirts and trousers and to apply insect repellent.