Top events in Ireland

September
05

Ireland's largest festival for the performing arts has grown from its modest beginnings in 1995 to become one of the city's best-loved events. It...

September
25

The best time to experience Dublin's many theatres is during the city's annual October Theatre Festival. The programme promises 'a bold, diverse,...

September
27

The Irish love their oysters, and every autumn Galway City spends four days and nights in tribute. The festival started in 1954 - highlights...

Kylemore Abbey Castle, Ireland
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Kylemore Abbey Castle, Ireland

© 123rf.com / Nico Smit

Ireland Travel Guide

Key Facts
Area

70,182 sq km (27,097 sq miles).

Population

4.8 million (2014).

Population density

68.9 per sq km.

Capital

Dublin.

Government

Republic.

Head of state

President Michael D Higgins since 2011.

Head of government

Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Enda Kenny since 2011.

Electricity

230 volts AC, 50Hz. British-style plugs with three square pins are used.

Ireland is one of the globe’s most singular travel destinations, a feisty, twinkling country far more famous for the sum of its parts than for any specific sight or attraction. Its landscapes are raw, its cities are animated and its history holds endless tales of adversity. Tying all this together is the Irish character, a fabled combination of bright-eyed bonhomie and bar-room banter: there’s good reason why the planet’s full of Irish pubs.

Lovable Dublin falls naturally as the most popular option for first-time visitors, although for all the capital city’s stately architecture and riverside charm, it only partly hints at what the wider country has to offer. The real spirit of today’s nation might be up for debate – it’s as likely to be found in a Connemara village as a Cork street scene – but searching for it is hugely enjoyable.

It’s often said that there are two Irelands. Despite its economic woes, 21st-century Ireland is a modern destination, full of fresh creativity. At the same time, of course, it’s somewhere rooted in the strongest of traditions, a country marked by humour, hospitality and more than the occasional late night. The craic of legend isn’t generally hard to find.

With all this in mind, it’s perhaps no surprise that Ireland caters for such a broad range of interests. Those in search of windswept hikes, Celtic relics and fiddle-and-song pubs will be well sated, but so too will those looking for on-trend gastronomy, family-friendly attractions or slick hotels. The country may be small but its cultural impact worldwide continues to be enormous, and this is due to far more than just a romantic notion of how it used to be.

Various icons and images enjoy close associations with Ireland (see everything from craggy peninsulas to pints of Guinness) but the real beauty of the country is the fact that it transcends every cliché that people throw at it. Its potential for adventure – for real, blood-pumping adventure – is all too often overlooked, while for those who just want to take it easy, the options are copious.

Travel Advice

Last updated: 28 August 2015

The travel advice summary below is provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the UK. 'We' refers to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. For their full travel advice, visit www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice.


Crime

Most visitors to Ireland experience no difficulties during their stay. Take sensible precautions to protect yourself from bag snatching and pick pocketing. Try to avoid carrying valuables and large sums of money. Make sure your vehicle is properly secured, and where possible park in secure parking areas.  Most incidents occur in the Dublin area. If you need to contact the emergency services call 112.

The Irish Tourist Assistance Service (ITAS) offers free support and practical help to victims of crime. This includes liaison with travel companies and financial institutions and, in emergency situations, arranging accommodation, meals and transport. ITAS recommends that you report any incident in person to the nearest Garda (Police) Station who will then contact the organisation.

Road travel

In 2013 there were 190 road deaths in Ireland (source: Department for Transport). This equates to 4.1 road deaths per 100,000 of population and compares to the UK average of 2.8 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2013.

Don’t drink and drive. You may be heavily penalised or even imprisoned if you are found driving over the limit. New legal limits were introduced in October 2011. The new limit is 50mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood (0.05%) for fully licensed drivers, and 20mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood (0.02%) for professional, learner and novice drivers. The police conduct random breath-tests on drivers. Holding and using a mobile phone whilst driving is banned.

If you relocate to Ireland you must register your vehicle within a week of arriving. Your car may be impounded if you fail to do so. 

See the European Commission, AA and RAC guides on driving in Ireland.

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