Top events in South Africa

August
09

Each year at the V&A Waterfront Amphitheatre in Cape Town, people gather to celebrate National Women's Day, marking the role that women played...

August
09

One for die-hard music fans who don’t mind a little mud with their melodies. Bands of varying fame and varying talent perform on seven different...

August
31

A festival of contemporary choreography and dance.

Zebra in Mokala National Park, South Africa
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Zebra in Mokala National Park, South Africa

© 123rf.com / Nico Smit

South Africa Travel Guide

Key Facts
Area

1,219,912 sq km (471,011 sq miles).

Population

48.4 million (2014).

Population density

39.7 per sq km.

Capital

Cape Town (legislative); Pretoria (executive); Bloemfontein (judicial).

Government

Republic.

Head of state

President Jacob Zuma since 2009.

Head of government

President Jacob Zuma since 2009.

Electricity

220/230 volts AC, 50Hz. Plugs have three fat round pins.

With golden beaches, jagged mountains and national parks overflowing with wildlife, South Africa is the Africa you’ve always imagined. While memories of a troubled past remain, the republic is well on the way to regaining its throne as the holiday capital of Africa, visited by nearly 10 million people every year.

Topping a long list of attractions is the republic’s spectacular wildlife and natural scenery. National parks and nature reserves preserve an incredible variety of landscapes – rolling plains, towering mountains, arid deserts, coastal fynbos (shrubland) and pure blue oceans – home to an incredible variety of wildlife, from lions and elephants to great white sharks and playful penguins.

South Africa's cities are no less varied. In the far south, lorded over by iconic Table Mountain, Cape Town is South Africa’s most accessible gateway, with gorgeous beaches, vibrant, multicultural neighbourhoods, famous vineyards, a lively nightlife and fine dining to rival any European capital. You’ll find a similarly cosmopolitan vibe in Johannesburg, the energetic capital, and in beachside Durban, where the hot sunshine is matched by the scorching curries cooked up by the South Asian community.

In between you can lose yourself for days on safari. The undisputed top spot for wildlife spotters is world-famous Kruger National Park, where the Big Five – lions, leopards, elephants, buffaloes and rhinos – are joined by hundreds of other African species.

If the landscape sounds diverse, wait until you meet the people. South Africa boasts 11 official languages and more than a dozen tribes, living alongside communities from Africa, Europe and the Indian subcontinent – little wonder this is known as the Rainbow Nation. This diversity is tangible everywhere, from the architecture and language to the nation’s spectacular cuisine.

Nevertheless, huge inequality remains, still sharply marked out along racial lines. To understand modern South Africa, everyone should visit Johannesburg’s moving Apartheid Museum, and Robben Island prison, where Nelson Mandela was held for 18 years. Or you could join a township tour in Soweto, which, like the rest of your trip, you’ll never forget.

Travel Advice

Last updated: 31 July 2015

The travel advice summary below is provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the UK. 'We' refers to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. For their full travel advice, visit www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice.


Crime

South Africa has a very high level of crime, including rape and murder. The risk of violent crime to visitors travelling to the main tourist destinations is generally low. The South African authorities give high priority to protecting tourists and tourism police are deployed in several large towns. Most cases of violent crime occur in the townships. Consult a reliable tour guide if you visit a township.

Incidents of vehicle hi-jacking and robbery are common, particularly after dark. Keep to main roads and park in well lit areas.

There are frequent incidents of car windows being broken and valuables taken while cars are waiting at junctions. Keep valuables out of sight.

Due to thefts at OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, you should vacuum-wrap luggage where local regulations permit. Keep all valuables in your carry-on luggage.

Keep large amounts of money, expensive jewellery, cameras and phones out of sight. Don’t change or withdraw large sums of money in busy public areas including foreign exchange facilities or ATMs. Thieves operate at international airports, and bus and railway stations. Keep your valuables safe and baggage with you at all times.

Don’t give personal or financial account information details to anyone. There are international fraud rings operating in South Africa, who may target visitors and charities.

Local travel

There are particularly high levels of crime in the Berea and Hillbrow districts of Johannesburg and around the Rotunda bus terminus in the Central Business District.

Be particularly vigilant in Durban’s city centre and beach front area.

Keep to main roads and avoid driving at night when visiting Northern KwaZulu Natal and Zululand, as there have been incidents of hi-jacking and robbery, particularly on isolated secondary roads.

Be vigilant on the approach roads to and from Kruger Park where there have been cases of car hijacking.

Avoid isolated beaches and picnic spots. Don’t walk alone, especially in remote areas. Hikers should stick to popular trails. There have been violent attacks on hikers and tourists on Table Mountain. Take care in quieter areas of the Park, especially early in the morning or just before the park closes.

Call the police (on 10111 or on 112 from a mobile phone) at the first sign of danger.

Mobile phone reception is generally good in major towns and cities but can be intermittent in more remote spots.

Road travel

You can drive using a UK Driving Licence for up to 12 months.

The standard of driving in South Africa can vary greatly and there are many fatal accidents every year.

On highways overtaking can occur in any lane including the hard shoulder. On single-lane roads the hard shoulder is also sometimes used by trucks and slower vehicles to allow faster vehicles to overtake. At quieter intersections, first vehicle to arrive sometimes has priority. On roundabouts, you should give way to the right, although this rule is often ignored.

Road standards are mostly very good, but some roads in remote areas are less well maintained and may have potholes. Drive cautiously, obey speed limits and avoid unfamiliar rural areas at night. Thieves have been known to employ various methods to make a vehicle stop (eg placing large stones in the middle of the road) enabling them to rob the occupants. Park in well-lit areas. Don’t pick up strangers or stop to help apparently distressed motorists, as this is a technique sometimes used by hijackers. It’s better to report any incident to the police.

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