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World Travel Guide > Guides > Europe > Italy

Italy Health Care and Vaccinations

Title Special precautions
Yellow Fever No
Typhoid No
Tetanus Yes
Rabies No
Malaria No
Hepatitis A Yes
Diphtheria Yes

Health Care

Travel insurance is advised for all visitors. In some medical cases, if you are European, you might be able to receive free treatment if you can show proof of a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) obtained in your country of origin.

The overall standards of healthcare in Italy are excellent. Hospitals and surgeries are well equipped and staff are proficient. In pharmacies, over-the-counter advice is given and standard medicines are sold.

Food and Drink

Tap water is generally safe to drink except for some rural areas. The inscription 'Acqua Non Potabile' means water is not drinkable. Milk is generally pasteurised and dairy products are safe for consumption. Local meat, poultry, seafood, fruit, vegetables and dairy products are considered safe to eat.

Other Risks

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends vaccinations for measles, mumps, rubella, polio, pertussis, pneumococci and hepatitis B.

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